Hot Best Seller

Best New Horror 18

Availability: Ready to download

Here is the latest edition of the world's premier annual showcase of horror and dark, fantasy fiction, from a series that has won the World Fantasy Award, British Fantasy Award, and the International Horror Guild Award. It features some of the very best short stories and novellas by today's masters of the macabre — including Neil Gaiman, Glen Hirshberg, Tanith Lee, Ramsey Here is the latest edition of the world's premier annual showcase of horror and dark, fantasy fiction, from a series that has won the World Fantasy Award, British Fantasy Award, and the International Horror Guild Award. It features some of the very best short stories and novellas by today's masters of the macabre — including Neil Gaiman, Glen Hirshberg, Tanith Lee, Ramsey Campbell, and Charles Coleman Finlay. Contents: Summer / Al Sarrantonio -- Digging deep / Ramsey Campbell -- Night watch / John Gordon -- Luxury of harm / Christopher Fowler -- Sentinels / Mark Samuels -- Saffron gatherers / Elizabeth Hand -- What nature abhors / Mark Morris -- Last reel / Lynda E. Rucker -- American dead / Jay Lake -- Between the cold moon and the earth / Peter Atkins -- Sob in the silence / Gene Wolfe -- Continuity error / Nicholas Royle -- Dr. Prida's dream-plagued patient / Michael Bishop -- Ones we leave behind / Mark Chadbourn -- Mine / Joel Lane -- Obsequy / David J. Schow -- Thrown / Don Tumasonis -- Houses under the sea / Caitlín R. Kiernan -- They / David Morrell -- Clockwork horror / F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre -- Making cabinets / Richard Christian Matheson -- Pol Pot's beautiful daughter (Fantasy) / Geoff Ryman -- Devil's smile / Glen Hirshberg -- Man who got off the ghost train / Kim Newman -- Necrology: 2006 / Stephen Jones & Kim Newman.


Compare

Here is the latest edition of the world's premier annual showcase of horror and dark, fantasy fiction, from a series that has won the World Fantasy Award, British Fantasy Award, and the International Horror Guild Award. It features some of the very best short stories and novellas by today's masters of the macabre — including Neil Gaiman, Glen Hirshberg, Tanith Lee, Ramsey Here is the latest edition of the world's premier annual showcase of horror and dark, fantasy fiction, from a series that has won the World Fantasy Award, British Fantasy Award, and the International Horror Guild Award. It features some of the very best short stories and novellas by today's masters of the macabre — including Neil Gaiman, Glen Hirshberg, Tanith Lee, Ramsey Campbell, and Charles Coleman Finlay. Contents: Summer / Al Sarrantonio -- Digging deep / Ramsey Campbell -- Night watch / John Gordon -- Luxury of harm / Christopher Fowler -- Sentinels / Mark Samuels -- Saffron gatherers / Elizabeth Hand -- What nature abhors / Mark Morris -- Last reel / Lynda E. Rucker -- American dead / Jay Lake -- Between the cold moon and the earth / Peter Atkins -- Sob in the silence / Gene Wolfe -- Continuity error / Nicholas Royle -- Dr. Prida's dream-plagued patient / Michael Bishop -- Ones we leave behind / Mark Chadbourn -- Mine / Joel Lane -- Obsequy / David J. Schow -- Thrown / Don Tumasonis -- Houses under the sea / Caitlín R. Kiernan -- They / David Morrell -- Clockwork horror / F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre -- Making cabinets / Richard Christian Matheson -- Pol Pot's beautiful daughter (Fantasy) / Geoff Ryman -- Devil's smile / Glen Hirshberg -- Man who got off the ghost train / Kim Newman -- Necrology: 2006 / Stephen Jones & Kim Newman.

30 review for Best New Horror 18

  1. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    this elephantine collection of short horror fiction from 2006 & 2007 has a lot that is mediocre but a good number of excellent pieces as well. the book includes a chapter on horror-related media in 2006 as well as a "necrology" of those that departed that year. not sure about the rationale for including the latter, but it was interesting to skim through. anyway, I'm going to ignore the dross and focus on the metal. 3 stars "The Saffron Gatherers" by Elizabeth Hand is a gorgeous little mood piece ab this elephantine collection of short horror fiction from 2006 & 2007 has a lot that is mediocre but a good number of excellent pieces as well. the book includes a chapter on horror-related media in 2006 as well as a "necrology" of those that departed that year. not sure about the rationale for including the latter, but it was interesting to skim through. anyway, I'm going to ignore the dross and focus on the metal. 3 stars "The Saffron Gatherers" by Elizabeth Hand is a gorgeous little mood piece about the end of an era and a way of living in the San Francisco Bay Area. great character work and great details - and as someone who lives in the Bay Area, I particularly appreciated the latter. this is a lovely and, ultimately, very depressing gem. I wouldn't call it horror but I'm not sure what else it would be. "The Last Reel" by Linda Rucker is a creepy old-fashioned tale of an inherited house, given a modern sheen in its use of film quotes. nicely disturbing ending. Rucker is a writer to watch. "Devil's Smile" by Glen Hirshberg is a moody, evocative story of a dying village and a horrific tale of terror told in a decrepit lighthouse. melancholy atmosphere to die for. haunting and ambiguous - my favorite sort of horror. "Continuity Error" by Nicholas Royle is one of those stories where the reader is as caught in the confusing loop of the narrative as the protagonist. I can honestly say I did not know what was happening or where the story was going - or ended up at - in this tale of a father, a car accident, an unhealthy obsession, and women who may or may not have something unpleasant in store for them. a nice little brain teaser. 4 stars "Houses Under the Sea" by Caitlin Kiernan was the most successful for me in establishing a genuinely eerie atmosphere. the story is about a reporter re-examining his relationship with a woman who led her cult followers into the sea. the prose is marvelous, really beautiful at times, and the story got under my skin. I really need to read more by the author. "Dr. Prida's Dream-Plagued Patient" by Michael Bishop is a delightful tale of various vampires. the prose is hilariously arch and the story is tricky. clearly Bishop is, as the Brits like to say, taking the piss out of vampire fiction. he doesn't seek to reinvent the wheel here but rather is pulling the wheel off of the wagon and hanging it up on the wall as a curious conversation piece. "The American Dead" by Jay Lake is superb. its terrible post-apocalyptic landscape, its use of village and cemetery, the sickening and escalating but mainly off-page threat from sinister religious types, its surprisingly sweet but never cloying portrait of children, its tragedy and bleakness (that ending!), the image of a downed American plane decaying in the middle of a river... smashing work by the recently deceased Jay Lake. I immediately ordered a novel by the author after finishing this one. "Thrown" by Don Tumasonis is a short bit of poetic, new school Weird Fiction. no supernatural beasties to speak of, but I still saw a little of Algernon Blackwood in its protagonist's otherworldly transcendence and a lot of Robert Aickman in its elegant prose, discomfitingly vague menace, and obscure, minor note narrative about a couple's strange vacation. "The Man Who Got Off the Ghost Train" by Kim Newman is like the movie adaptation of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen - except it is actually good. tremendous fun. I won't say anything else about it because I plan on reading the collection that this novella later appeared in: The Man from the Diogenes Club. 5 stars "Pol Pot's Beautiful Daughter (Fantasy)" by Geoff Ryman wow! Kiernan's "Houses" and Lake's "American Dead" come very close, but Ryman's story is, for me, the most glittering and memorable jewel in this collection. it is a ghost story and it is story about Cambodia then and now. it may be because I recently visited Cambodia and it is still on my mind, but this tale about a vapid young lady reclaiming herself and forging her own destiny really connected with me on a deep level. the writing is smashing; I particularly admired how the dialogue captured the musical quality and slightly off phrasing of some Asian languages when they are translated into English - I was happily reminded of how my Filipino relatives talk to each in English. some reviewers have found Ryman's use of dialogue disrespectful and that perplexes me - I found the opposite to be the true. but the story is so much more than that. I loved its humor and its kindness (in a horror collection!), its real life details, its humanism in the face of past atrocities and its theme of redemption. I love how it moved me to tears. brilliant!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    Yet another MAMMOTH BOOK OF... read. I must say, I've become a bit burnt out on modern horror writing at the moment, which is tough because it's...well, not my bread and butter, exactly, but specific to some labors of love I indulge in. But reading an endless slew of submissions, and at least partially reading this volume with an eye towards possible purchases, I'm definitely...burnt. Best to recharge the batteries with the old and the different. Reading this particular volume, I actually found m Yet another MAMMOTH BOOK OF... read. I must say, I've become a bit burnt out on modern horror writing at the moment, which is tough because it's...well, not my bread and butter, exactly, but specific to some labors of love I indulge in. But reading an endless slew of submissions, and at least partially reading this volume with an eye towards possible purchases, I'm definitely...burnt. Best to recharge the batteries with the old and the different. Reading this particular volume, I actually found myself feeling dismay at the "The Year In.." section. It's a wonderful resource, well worth reading in small bites to get a snapshot of the genre and note the few books/movies/whatever that sound promising. But jeez, the vomiting tide of horror "product" that gets churned out every year never ceases to...dismay. One can only assume the good stuff can get sieved by a sharp editor, but then skilled editors are disappearing as their talents go under-appreciated in a world of e-books and publish-on-demand and everyone being an expert in everything. Sad. But on to the stories themselves, which is why we all came, right? This was a pretty solid volume, all told, although the usual bugaboos of excessive length and underwhelming endings continue to be apparent in the genre of modern horror short fiction. There was only one clunker, "The Luxury of Harm" by Christopher Fowler, and even that was okay - two old friends (one an author) attend a low rent horror convention and discuss murderers and victims. It seemed like more of an excuse for Fowler to vent about the "types" that haunt conventions. Not bad but not memorable. Next comes a whole flotilla of stories that are good solid reads but some singular aspect falls a little short (see length/endings note above). "The Night Watch" by John Gordon has a historian stay late at the Norwhich Castle museum (atmospherically described), only to find himself menaced by a particularly aggressive and mysterious night watchman...or is he? The author's introduction, a conceit I generally like in anthologies, can occasionally undercut a story somewhat and such was the case here. Mark Samuels' "Sentinels" is (as admitted by the author) an homage to the classic Donald Pleasance film DEATH LINE (aka RAW MEAT) from 1972, mashed up with a bit of Clive Barker's "The Midnight Meat Train". A seedy, alienated police detective investigates cold cases of people gone missing on the subway and their connection to the abandoned "ghost stations" of the London Underground and myriad subterranean urban legends. There's some evocatively creepy stuff here (I love the conceit of an "inverted skyscraper") but the omniscient 3rd person voice becomes a bit too expositional in the end, synopsizing what should have been presented as action (actually, heavy, story-ending exposition is another recurrent negative trait in general throughout this collection). "What Nature Abhors" by Mark Morris has a great set-up - a nightmarish scenario of an amnesiac waking on a train to discover himself in an abandoned town where all the storefront mannequins' heads are wrapped in black plastic. Then a mob of people, faces also wrapped, arrive... It's appropriately dreamlike but stories like this tend to have only a limited number of likely endings and this one is no different (you can hear a podcast reading of this story at TALES TO TERRIFY here - fast forward to the 39 minute mark). Not bad, achieves a Ramsey Campbell or even Robert Aickman-ish vibe at times. "The Last Reel" by Lynda E. Rucker also effectively sketches a creepy scenario - a couple returning to the woman's inherited property out in the countryside that an odd, old aunt left to her. The aunt was estranged (and strange) and her house proves to be filled with interesting items that slowly impinge their personality on the inheritor. It's well-written and nicely simple in the growing, eerie dread department but the ending is kind of flat - I'd hoped for more from a story thread in which the couple are playing a movie-naming game (the last line could have tied things together nicely with something like "How about BELL, BOOK & CANDLE, NIGHT OF THE EAGLE and ...I MARRIED A WITCH?") (The podcast I edit for, Pseudopod, did a reading of this tale, which can be heard here: The Last Reel. Peter Atkins' "Between The Cold Moon and the Earth" proves that familiar endings need not be anti-climactic if the presentation is interesting. Here, a girl relates her American travel adventures to a friend, but her Scheherazade-like narrative gets more and more outre as the story unfolds. I'm not sure if it works, really, but it has a nice dark fantasy feel to it. In "Sob In Silence" by Gene Wolfe a horror author entertains a friend and his family at a home where terrible things once happened to children in the past. But terrible things still happen to children, as we all know. It's essentially a well-written version of the classic "revenge from beyond the grave" trope, with some nicely shocking moments. Nicholas Royle's "Continuity Error" is a bit of an oddity - essentially a long character study of a disturbed individual who fixates on real-world crime landmarks in London (Christie & Nilsen's old flats are visited) and the production of Clive Barker's HELLRAISER film (the set of which he visited in a journalistic capacity - and which allows him to name check the editor of this actual volume, as Stephen Jones was the film's publicist at the time - not sure how I feel about that last part). The main character swims through his memories of the past, sketching a potential serial-killer in the making for the reader. It's interesting without ever actually getting scary, more like ominous, which is fine, I guess. Vietnam during the war with America is the setting for "The Ones We Leave Behind" by Mark Chadbourn, in which a secret black-ops mission into North Vietnam is trying to find out why enemy troops seemed to vanish, and uncovers an ancient, world-threatening horror in a buried temple accessible by the notorious Vietcong tunnel system. The characters, times and setting are expertly sketched, and there's a good sense of tension as the tunnels are entered. Unfortunately, the ending is another one of these "press exposition button now" moments, and the central idea is a bit too similar to Richard Matheson's story "Disappearing Act" (and resultant TWILIGHT ZONE episode "And When The Sky Was Opened"). David Schow's "Obsequy", about the moving of a small-town graveyard and the resultant rise of the dead with unfinished plans for the living, seems an awkward merging of a particular character study with a much larger plot, leading to an abrupt and emotionally unresolved ending that makes me feel like this was more of a novel or novella concept abandoned than a short story. Richard Christian Matheson's "Making Cabinets" is a flash piece about the emotional blowback of being a close friend of someone who proves to be a serial killer. Good but slight. Next up are the solid "good" stories. The book opens with "Summer", Al Sarrantonio's admitted homage to Ray Bradbury in which he imagines one of those endless, adolescent summers of youth... and what happens if the summer never ends and it just keeps getting hotter. Nicely fable-esque. Not frightening, really, but a solid weird tale. The cutely effective (and short) "Dr. Prida's Dream-Plagued Patient" features the nightmares of a familiar monster as efficiently told by Michael Bishop, who should receive accolades for knowing just how long a story idea like this deserved to be spun out. Joel Lane, whose work I like, examines the grief-ridden, necrophilic roots of love songs and popular music in "Mine", in which a music star visits a brothel as part of his pre-tour ritual. I enjoyed "Thrown" by Don Tumasonis but imagine others might be a bit, well, thrown by the surrealistic excursion across Crete of a hiking couple waylaid by a disastrous flood and the husband's growing certainty that something just isn't right. There's some wonderful scenic descriptions here and strong surreal imagery and tone that, again, had something of the Aickmanesque about it (perhaps it's the isolation?). "Houses Under The Sea" is Caitlín R. Kiernan's Lovecraftian (a term that gets thrown about a bit too much, and too simply, so I tend to use it sparingly) tale - a reporter's memoir of a brief relationship with a brilliant but unbalanced woman, fixated on the secrets under the sea, who later became a doomsday cult leader. This is a great example of a character study that is also a successful, plotted narrative. Very sold writing. Good stuff. The creator of Rambo, David Morrell, turns in a brutal, raw-boned tale of survival in the past as isolated settlers battle wolves during a blizzard in "They". F. Gwynplaine Macintyre tries a recurrent horror story approach I tend to be wary of in "The Clockwork Horror" as Edgar Allan Poe investigates the secrets of a supposed chess-playing automaton. He pulls it off and I give him credit for the characterization of Poe as a sharp student of his own ratiocination and not a mooning, drunken morbid romantic. Even better, the story doesn't undercut Poe's own "Maelzel's Chess-Player" (by which I mean it doesn't posit some other revelation and then has Poe lie in his famous essay) but instead, builds the psychological and grandly Gothic horror on the unfurnished detail. Impressive. Another story that's both brutally realistic (like Morrell's), while being psychological and Gothic, is "The Devil's Smile" by Glen Hirshberg. Set in the 19th century, it follows a surveyor sent by the Government to codify the lighthouse system of the Eastern Shore, his trip to a lonely keeper and her grievous vigil, rooted in a terrible maritime disaster. This is one of those stories who's horror seems horrible enough, before a coda adds on the weird. Perhaps just a tad overwritten, but a nice addition to the classic sea-based horror story. A moment now for the novella-sized piece by Kim Newman that rounds out the book. As I mentioned in my review of The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror 19, while I love Newman's non-fiction work (seriously, every horror movie fan should read Nightmare Movies: A Critical Guide to Contemporary Horror Films), I was a bit hesitant about "Cold Snap", the longish piece in that year's Mammoth Book. In some sense, I've made a decision to steer away from horror/fantasy action, especially these homage-ridden, comic book style "worlds" of occult detective and empowered individuals fighting monsters and demons. I love that stuff, grew up with in in fact, but in another review I may expand on my feelings that horror is not well-served by serialized stories. Anyway, here's Newman with another story of The Diogenes Club - founded by Mycroft Holmes, they've defended England from horrors for over a century, and Newman has a long, involved history for the group and it's characters (and their enemies) all laid out. It's much like The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1 by Alan Moore, but that's not meant as a slight, as I believe it's a field well-ploughed even earlier (In this particular story, Newman name-drops Carnacki, Flaxman Low and Adam Adamant - that last, especially, made me smile). And much like "Cold Snap" from MAMMOTH 19, I found myself won over by "The Man Who Got Off The Ghost Train", in which perennial character Richard Jeperson relates his initiation-by-fire into the club back in the 1950's in a case involving a haunted luxury train (think the Overlook Hotel on rails). The success of this has to do with Newmans' deft hand with both action and character - he balances a sense of the human beings involved in this horror comic book scenario with a solid sense of the best of pulp-action writing, and none of its weaknesses. In fact, these stories would make a good comic book series, as all the characters are colorful types - the team consists this time of Jeperson as the callow, psychic teddy-boy youth in Edwardian frock coat and hidden straight razor (recalling Grant Morrison's Gideon Stargrave, himself a take on Michael Moorcock's Jerry Cornelius), a psychic projecting French femme fatale, a beatnik psychometrist and jazz musician, and the long-suffering, Quatermass-like sub-atomic physicist and current head of the Club. Not everyone survives this adventure, sadly, as the story winds through old folklore, suicides, demonic possession, a mysterious little girl and the secret codes to the nuclear arsenal. It's a slam-bang comic-book action/horror mash-up and it goes down a treat. Finally, we get to the excellent stories, the ones that really made the collection shine. Elizabeth Hand does an amazing job with "The Saffron Gatherers", a story that lulls you into complacency with it's deceptive descriptions of the easy opulence and aesthetic concerns of moneyed individuals. The end of this rarefied life, however, is subtly foreshadowed through a focus on an ancient culture and their beautiful artworks, the only things we have to remember them. You may find yourself asking where the horror comes in, until the last page. Literary, powerful, not for every taste but the emotional impact of the ending packed quite a wallop. Jay Lake's "The American Dead" serves as a nice counterpoint to Hand's tale - post-apocalypse, it's a grim view of a burnt-out, used-up world whose inhabitants live their short, brutish, disease-ridden lives in the long shadows of those long-past, beautiful, bountiful, wealthy immortals: The Americans. Again, lit-styled, dark and hopeless (the fixation on pornography and sex as increasingly failed commodities is spot-on), so if you don't dig that then it's not for you, but an incredibly powerful tale all the same. Bought it for Pseudopod, the episode is here. The last two excellent stories provide a nice scope of the current horror spectrum. "Pol Pot's Beautiful Daughter (Fantasy)" by Geoff Ryman, in which the imaginary titular character deals with the karmic debt of her father's actions - is very moving (I actually teared up a bit at the ending) and straddles the line between dark fantasy and horror very adeptly (the horror mainly arises from our fore-knowledge of the terrible events in the past, and the J-Horror type ghosts' manifestations). The characters are endearing and in an age where the line continues to be pushed as to what a "civilized" society should be allowed to get away with (all in the name of "liberty" and "security", of course, and who cares that it benefits the coffers of a select, politically tied-in few? Why do you ask? Do you hate America?), it's nice to read a story about moral responsibility for past actions. On the other end of the spectrum, we have Ramsey Campbell's "Digging Deep", a short, punchy, nasty little horror story that few people seem capable of writing anymore. An unlikeable man awakens from an illness to find himself buried alive. Good thing he's got his cel-phone with him...or is it? So, there you go. Seemingly, a bit more of the solid stories this year 'round. Stephen Jones knows his stuff. And yet, those eternally recurring problems in horror fiction still rankle. I do believe I'll quit for now and go read something else.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Desir-Spinelli

    Honestly, the best thing about this book was the cover art. The worst thing was the overly long and self indulgent forward (~70 pages of forward vs 430 pages of story), wherein the editor soap boxes against the International Horror Guild and their snubbing of the anthology titles in their awards. It was an extremely awkward thing to read, an angry rant about the big bad bullies over at IHG, at the beginning of a book we are meant to enjoy. I'm not saying the editors concerns aren't valid- just t Honestly, the best thing about this book was the cover art. The worst thing was the overly long and self indulgent forward (~70 pages of forward vs 430 pages of story), wherein the editor soap boxes against the International Horror Guild and their snubbing of the anthology titles in their awards. It was an extremely awkward thing to read, an angry rant about the big bad bullies over at IHG, at the beginning of a book we are meant to enjoy. I'm not saying the editors concerns aren't valid- just that printing their concerns in every volume 18 is a giant waste of paper. Speaking of wastes of paper, I bought a bunch of these "Best new horror" volumes, at a used book store. I kind of regret the bulk purchase, because the first one I read was such a tremendous disappointment- it was was more often moody, dark fantasy and less often horror. Eventually I'll try the others, fingers crossed. On to the stories: A couple stories were enjoyable and true to the genre of horror (Digging deep, Night watch, Sentinels, The Last Reel, The Ones we Leave behind, Obsequey, They, Devils smile, making cabinets)... Others were enjoyable and well written, but in no way would I call them horror (Pol Pots beautiful daughter- fantasy, The american dead- dystopian, sob in the silence-supernatural revenge) Still others were simply too moody, uneventful, or flowery to be enjoyable at all- let alone scary (Luxury of harm, saffron gatherers, what nature abhors, between the cold moon and the earth, continuity error, mine, thrown, houses under the sea, clockwork horror, the man who got off the ghost train)

  4. 4 out of 5

    GD

    This just about got 2 stars, but a few of the stories, especially the last one by Kim Newman, which feels like it took up a quarter of the book, were great. But this is overall the worst of the Mammoth Books of Best New Horror I've read, 3 or 4 so far. I'll tell you right now what's wrong with this, and a lot of horror in general. The writers are too fucking serious!!! I'm so tired of reading horror stories that try to be literary, it drives me up the wall! There were some stories in here, like This just about got 2 stars, but a few of the stories, especially the last one by Kim Newman, which feels like it took up a quarter of the book, were great. But this is overall the worst of the Mammoth Books of Best New Horror I've read, 3 or 4 so far. I'll tell you right now what's wrong with this, and a lot of horror in general. The writers are too fucking serious!!! I'm so tired of reading horror stories that try to be literary, it drives me up the wall! There were some stories in here, like the one where San Francisco falls into the ocean, that took itself so seriously it was just hilarious. Don't get me wrong, dudes like Poe and Lovecraft seemed to be serious as shit most of the time, but they had the advantage of also being fantastic writers. The ones in this book, god. One story that I thought had a lot great potential was "The Last Reel," a genuinely creepy, scary story that was perfectly paced, the dread building up like a model horror story, and then the ending was one of those that don't exactly tell you what happened, but you know it's bad... fuck you!! On a positive note, "Sentinel," about some beasties in the subway; though it obviously owes a lot to Creep and Midnight Meat Train, it was awesome. David Schow, as always, like Shaft, who delivers ten times out of ten, blew most of the competition out of the water with his ballsy badass "Obesquy." And best of all, Kim Newman's gigantic "The Man Who Got Off the Ghost Train," which isn't even really a horror story, but about a kickass team of psychics who work for the British government and are always scrambling behind the scenes to make sure we aren't invaded by interplanetary evil. I've got one more of these collections sitting around unread, I don't remember the number but it's got an old woman with a butcher knife on the cover. Hope it's better than this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Greg Kerestan

    This is a very solid Best New Horror, and even if it weren't, I would give high points for containing not just one of Kim Newman's Richard Jeperson stories, but a full novella! "The Man Who Got Off the Ghost Train" is a fantastic Jeperson entry, and I suspect Moffat and Company have ripped off the Diogenes Club series more than once for New Who adventures. Plus, "Houses Under the Sea," "They" and "Making Cabinets" round out the collection's back end to provide the requisite head-scratchers and c This is a very solid Best New Horror, and even if it weren't, I would give high points for containing not just one of Kim Newman's Richard Jeperson stories, but a full novella! "The Man Who Got Off the Ghost Train" is a fantastic Jeperson entry, and I suspect Moffat and Company have ripped off the Diogenes Club series more than once for New Who adventures. Plus, "Houses Under the Sea," "They" and "Making Cabinets" round out the collection's back end to provide the requisite head-scratchers and chillers. Highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica McDonough

    Some of the stories in this collection we're a little stale or played. I can honestly say I didn't like quite a few the stories as for the stories I like though I really like them and it was worth reading the whole book for them. Also at the very end of the book there's from useful Print House Bookstore and magazine listed that you may be able to send your short stories and manuscripts to. All in all it definitely deserves a 4 instead of a three or five in my head because there were some really Some of the stories in this collection we're a little stale or played. I can honestly say I didn't like quite a few the stories as for the stories I like though I really like them and it was worth reading the whole book for them. Also at the very end of the book there's from useful Print House Bookstore and magazine listed that you may be able to send your short stories and manuscripts to. All in all it definitely deserves a 4 instead of a three or five in my head because there were some really bad stories in here and I don't think they were the best but maybe they were the best of that year. As I said though the good ones are so good the stay with me for a while.

  7. 5 out of 5

    J.

    The first 75 and last 60 pages of this book are just a list of things that happened this year. (?) Stories are--as most anthologies--pretty varied in quality. But there are a significant number of really good ones.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Maas

    Great anthology! Look out for David Morrel, of Rambo fame. He writes a great tale - Them. Regardless, great anthology!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laronza Wiley-moore

    I didn't enjoy this book... some of these stories cannot be categorized as"horror". There were a couple of decent stories the rest I had to Make myself finish. I didn't enjoy this book... some of these stories cannot be categorized as"horror". There were a couple of decent stories the rest I had to Make myself finish.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kendricvegayahoo.Com

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. that the writer must have experienced such a thing because its like based on a true story wowwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Henrik Andersson

    Finally finished this book and the vast majority of it is absolute rubbish. The stories read more like writing exercises than anything else, some far too long and most too busy with prose or being ""proper literature"" to focus on a good story. They're far from scary, they are hopelessly predictable and based on old ideas, and you mostly find yourself waiting for them to get to the point, or conclusion. A very small number of stories do stand out though, Mark Samuel's ""Sentinels"" for example wh Finally finished this book and the vast majority of it is absolute rubbish. The stories read more like writing exercises than anything else, some far too long and most too busy with prose or being ""proper literature"" to focus on a good story. They're far from scary, they are hopelessly predictable and based on old ideas, and you mostly find yourself waiting for them to get to the point, or conclusion. A very small number of stories do stand out though, Mark Samuel's ""Sentinels"" for example which has an intriguing setup which would be a fantastic first half-hour of a film, but as usual end up with the age-old copout ending of ""and then I realized I was going to die"" which got tiresome at the ass end of the 70s. Richard Christian Matheson also demonstrates efficiency by providing such a lean story that it's almost shorter than his introduction.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    I've read most of the stories in this collection, and, having read most of the other collections in the series, I have to say it's not one of the best. It's also not bad, per se. To focus on the positive, however, I'll just hit the highlights, which include "Sob in the Silence" and "What Nature Abhors." The latter is truly eerie, while the former offers a revenge-by-default plotline. "Making Cabinets," a brief portrait of a serial killer's significant other after the fact, is also haunting in it I've read most of the stories in this collection, and, having read most of the other collections in the series, I have to say it's not one of the best. It's also not bad, per se. To focus on the positive, however, I'll just hit the highlights, which include "Sob in the Silence" and "What Nature Abhors." The latter is truly eerie, while the former offers a revenge-by-default plotline. "Making Cabinets," a brief portrait of a serial killer's significant other after the fact, is also haunting in its sparsity and refreshing in its originality.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    From the endless, intensifying 'Summer' of Al Sarrantonio's imagination to Kim Newman's final 'The Man Who Got Off The Ghost Train', these are very good examples of finding horror in the damnedest places and everywhere else. These are all stories that appeared elsewhere and are reprinted here as an assembly of the best. The Mammoth Book series starts off with a lengthy introduction that sums up the genre for the year, and ends with a necrology. Great history. From the endless, intensifying 'Summer' of Al Sarrantonio's imagination to Kim Newman's final 'The Man Who Got Off The Ghost Train', these are very good examples of finding horror in the damnedest places and everywhere else. These are all stories that appeared elsewhere and are reprinted here as an assembly of the best. The Mammoth Book series starts off with a lengthy introduction that sums up the genre for the year, and ends with a necrology. Great history.

  14. 4 out of 5

    bluetyson

    The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror (Mammoth Book of Best New Horror) by Stephen Jones (2007)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn

    Always enjoyable. :)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean Flynn

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paul Montgomery

  20. 4 out of 5

    April Infinite

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kaci

  22. 5 out of 5

    K

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hanie Syafura

  24. 4 out of 5

    stephanie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michele Davis

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hans

  28. 4 out of 5

    Curt Jordan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Martin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Margarita

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...