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Poetry! Poetry! Poetry!

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POEM ADDRESSING CONSPIRACY THEORISTS You're right to understand the underlying devious intentions of this poem. You are definitely on to something. You should really examine my other poems too (just google me) and notice the clues I have left behind. You might want to share what you find with others by starting a blog, informing the media, making videos, etc. I have said t POEM ADDRESSING CONSPIRACY THEORISTS You're right to understand the underlying devious intentions of this poem. You are definitely on to something. You should really examine my other poems too (just google me) and notice the clues I have left behind. You might want to share what you find with others by starting a blog, informing the media, making videos, etc. I have said to my wife and others that I don't understand how few people notice the prophecy in my work. For reasons that are probably obvious to you, I don't want to directly address what I'm not openly addressing, except to say that, yes, I am addressing what you think I am. I know; it blows my mind too!


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POEM ADDRESSING CONSPIRACY THEORISTS You're right to understand the underlying devious intentions of this poem. You are definitely on to something. You should really examine my other poems too (just google me) and notice the clues I have left behind. You might want to share what you find with others by starting a blog, informing the media, making videos, etc. I have said t POEM ADDRESSING CONSPIRACY THEORISTS You're right to understand the underlying devious intentions of this poem. You are definitely on to something. You should really examine my other poems too (just google me) and notice the clues I have left behind. You might want to share what you find with others by starting a blog, informing the media, making videos, etc. I have said to my wife and others that I don't understand how few people notice the prophecy in my work. For reasons that are probably obvious to you, I don't want to directly address what I'm not openly addressing, except to say that, yes, I am addressing what you think I am. I know; it blows my mind too!

30 review for Poetry! Poetry! Poetry!

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    I read a review of Davis’ first collection, Hitler’s Mustache, in the online journal, The Dream People, a few years ago. It sounded appealing to me, but I forget about it. Until I met him during the AWP Conference in Denver this year. I was drunk and in a bar. I think we were in the bathroom. That sounds kind of sordid, but it wasn’t. Anyway, he offered to send me a copy of his book, and I happily accepted. And not only did he send me Hitler’s Mustache, but he also sent me this book. Now as far a I read a review of Davis’ first collection, Hitler’s Mustache, in the online journal, The Dream People, a few years ago. It sounded appealing to me, but I forget about it. Until I met him during the AWP Conference in Denver this year. I was drunk and in a bar. I think we were in the bathroom. That sounds kind of sordid, but it wasn’t. Anyway, he offered to send me a copy of his book, and I happily accepted. And not only did he send me Hitler’s Mustache, but he also sent me this book. Now as far as Hitler’s Mustache, unfortunately I had trouble getting into it and did not finish, although I will return to it eventually. While with Poetry! Poetry! Poetry!, I liked this book a great deal more. My favorite poetry book that I’ve read in years. I often have trouble liking contemporary poetry and my tastes are very specific. My difficulties are related to its experimental aesthetic and abstractness. I need to establish a connection with the poetry, and this needs to be done with some degree of lucidity on the poet’s part. I’m currently an MFA student with a prose concentration in a school that is lacking in fiction classes, and have had to take a few poetry-esque courses to make up for this deficiency, and they have been pretty tough for me. But this book felt like a vacation from that. It breaks down poetry to its most basic form, breaking through the “code” and being extremely self-referential and telling the reader what they should be experiencing while reading each poem. Actually, the title of each poem addresses a specific kind of reader. I feel like my description doesn’t do this book justice, so see it for yourself. Go here to read a few poems and find out what I’m talking about: http://www.actionyes.org/issue12/davi...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    this book is a huge i love you to poetry. it is a sarcastic i love you as much as it is sincere. peter davis is self-aware of the publishing industry and all its faults and beauty and calls all of that out like a true lover of poetry. it's hard to review this in a short blurb. it's very hard. reading this book is easier and loving it is very easy. i feel like i might seem biased because peter was one of my undergrad poetry professors. and i now consider him a friend as much as i can consider a l this book is a huge i love you to poetry. it is a sarcastic i love you as much as it is sincere. peter davis is self-aware of the publishing industry and all its faults and beauty and calls all of that out like a true lover of poetry. it's hard to review this in a short blurb. it's very hard. reading this book is easier and loving it is very easy. i feel like i might seem biased because peter was one of my undergrad poetry professors. and i now consider him a friend as much as i can consider a lot of other poets i've met a friend. not friends in that i know him very well, but in that i know him enough that i know his sincerity and his love of poetry. and that love is what is real in this book. it is as real as the love that one will feel in the poetry of o'hara or berrigan or (god bless him) the lovingest of all, joe brainard. peter davis wants you to feel this love. because it's real and true.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jake Omstead

    This is probably the first poetry book I would give to someone interested in American poets. Not every poem has to be a riddle or play word games with your mind. Some poems can be fun, light, and still get to the inner workings of human emotion. Pete uses this book to talk to an invisible audience and keeps you bound to the pages until the end. I've read this three or four times now. This is probably the first poetry book I would give to someone interested in American poets. Not every poem has to be a riddle or play word games with your mind. Some poems can be fun, light, and still get to the inner workings of human emotion. Pete uses this book to talk to an invisible audience and keeps you bound to the pages until the end. I've read this three or four times now.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Thompson

    In Poetry, Poetry, Poetry, Peter Davis uses the prose form to challenge the reader into questioning what it actually means to be a poet and what meaning can derive from poetry itself. Because of this, Davis definitely and obviously challenges readers and writers of poetry to reflect upon themselves, particularly about the “why.” Why do we write it and why do we want others to read it? I learned a lot about confronting myself about my writing. I write more prose than poetry, yet his prose style In Poetry, Poetry, Poetry, Peter Davis uses the prose form to challenge the reader into questioning what it actually means to be a poet and what meaning can derive from poetry itself. Because of this, Davis definitely and obviously challenges readers and writers of poetry to reflect upon themselves, particularly about the “why.” Why do we write it and why do we want others to read it? I learned a lot about confronting myself about my writing. I write more prose than poetry, yet his prose style, in my belief, transitions over all kinds of writing for this reason. I had to confront the efforts of a writer, and the connections between the readers, and the meaning of art along with why writers do it. I found the quote “Poetry has isolated me form the world more than it has connected me to it” relatable and thought-provoking because I also feel the same way. Granted, I write fantasy, but, again, I think it can go towards all writers within their genre. We express ourselves through our art, but ultimately the art gets analyzed, not necessarily the expression we feel when creating the piece, and I thinks why we continuously write. We’re looking for something within ourselves and our ability to feel connected to others. That’s probably why many of us decide to make it into a profession and seek admiration from others. It’s the only way we can feel like our expressions were absorbed or at least considered, and that’s a hard thing to accomplish in today’s world. Even more so, Davis discussed “I do feel like I have important, beautiful things to say about the world, I just can’t think of them at this particular moment” and I found that a sheer contrast. It brings up the idea that even artists can’t always express themselves, even if they want to. This can be very frustrating and even hard to explain. For Davis to say it so easily, however, brings an understanding no one can deny. I believe this emotion is expressed most vividly when he writes, “I have this rage that I can’t explain. It’s sad.” Maybe that’s because that’s how I personally feel. I cannot stop writing, even when I want to. It’s possibly the only thing I have to calm my nerves about the world, and I hold it very dear to me, even when I have those rare and fleeting days that I hate it. I really enjoyed this collection for its masked simplicity. I say masked, because, ultimately, it isn’t simple. Or, as he writes, “It isn’t easy.” And I love how simple prose can provoke so much confusion, emotion, and philosophy. I believe there really is an ego when it comes to writing. Whether I think this is a good or a bad thing, I still don’t know, because it seems to be a lose-lose situation in art. If you don’t say anything, no one will know who you are, but if you say something, many perceive it as bragging. But it’s not. It’s a writer simply trying to communication something with the world. And Davis expresses this seriously but also lightens it with humor in a very effective manner. For example, he writes “Other times, I feel that you are pretentious or too serious or too something or too stupid.” But then ends that exact poem with “Thank goodness we all drink so much!” This allows that barrier of seriously philosophy to not be so overwhelming, but rather a friendly conversation, and I really appreciated reading over such a relatable voice. I learned, perhaps, something I have learned before but not necessarily something that I force myself to analyze on a regular basis. And, for that, I can thank Peter Davis for bringing the thoughts back to the forefront in my mind. Perhaps, I will post a review about him on sites, as his book often discusses that as one of the nicer things to do for a writer, and I’d like to be nice to appreciate him, if I cannot appreciate everything about the world or myself every moment of the day.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    As you might guess from the title, this book of poetry is really funny. The cover includes bands of color radiating from a giant "thumb's up." It's hilarious. I always appreciate humor in poetry books, especially since poetry is so often dour. The whole book is a series of prose poems, each one addressing a very specific group, like "Poem Addressing Kittens," or "Poem Addressing Dictators," or about the poet's feelings, like "Poem Addressing my Desperation" or "Poem Addressing Some of My Boring W As you might guess from the title, this book of poetry is really funny. The cover includes bands of color radiating from a giant "thumb's up." It's hilarious. I always appreciate humor in poetry books, especially since poetry is so often dour. The whole book is a series of prose poems, each one addressing a very specific group, like "Poem Addressing Kittens," or "Poem Addressing Dictators," or about the poet's feelings, like "Poem Addressing my Desperation" or "Poem Addressing Some of My Boring Wishes." It is a great idea for a poetry book. I saw videos of the poet reading some of the work online before the book came out and was excited to get my copy. The book is good like the poems I saw online. The poems all have the same format, with the title addressing someone or something, and the poems are almost always prose poems. I think there are one or two that are very short and have line breaks. The only thing I didn't like about the book is the poet mentions poetry promotion in too many of the poems. He very often mentions wanting a tenure teaching position, to get invited to a read, or someone buying his book. I know it is a joke that making money with poetry is kind of hopeless, but sometimes it really does feel like the poet is seriously asking us to do these things for him. I also wish there was a little less cursing in the poem. I think poems rarely need it. My favorites in the book: Poem Addressing People Reading This Under Water Poem Addressing Kittens Poem Addressing Conspiracy Theorists Poem Addressing the Very Numerous Instants That Cling Together, Forming an Enormous Rope of Life That Is Goofy and Strange (Anti has more poems from the book)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Goodreads Review Addressing the Goodreads Review I Might Have Written for Poetry! Poetry! Poetry! I took some time away from thinking about me & my ars poetica to read Peter Davis's Poetry! Poetry! Poetry! I feel that I can claim some of the power I've lost in not having written this fine book by recommending it to you. Listen up poets: for a good time read this book. I wish that there was a 4.5 stars rating on Goodreads. 5 stars is Dante, and--let's face it-- Peter Davis's Poetry! Poetry! Poetry Goodreads Review Addressing the Goodreads Review I Might Have Written for Poetry! Poetry! Poetry! I took some time away from thinking about me & my ars poetica to read Peter Davis's Poetry! Poetry! Poetry! I feel that I can claim some of the power I've lost in not having written this fine book by recommending it to you. Listen up poets: for a good time read this book. I wish that there was a 4.5 stars rating on Goodreads. 5 stars is Dante, and--let's face it-- Peter Davis's Poetry! Poetry! Poetry! isn't Dante. But it's fucking close. Very fucking close. The only thing that is not awesome about Peter Davis's Poetry! Poetry! Poetry! is that it exists in the same day and age as Goodreads. While you read it, you will be forced to think about stars. How many stars will you give it? What will those stars say about you? I hope that my four star rating is acceptable to you. Do you like it? How does it make you feel about me? Do you feel about me? I feel about me often.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Ashton

    Here's a representative example of the prose poems that make up the book. It's called "Poem Addressing the Possibility That You're Reading This Poem in a Literary Journal": "Good for you. I read some journals too, but the odds of actually finding this poem can't be good. Thanks for making the effort. I hope you feel like it was worth it." Four stars is a little high for this. Points for the ingenuity of composing each poem as if the poet could only be thinking about the audiences and institution Here's a representative example of the prose poems that make up the book. It's called "Poem Addressing the Possibility That You're Reading This Poem in a Literary Journal": "Good for you. I read some journals too, but the odds of actually finding this poem can't be good. Thanks for making the effort. I hope you feel like it was worth it." Four stars is a little high for this. Points for the ingenuity of composing each poem as if the poet could only be thinking about the audiences and institutions in which poems typically circulate in our current literary period (and therefore that the poems will take this form), and for trying to write a poem to address every possibility imaginable within that framework. Also for being genuinely funny. But the book could be made much better by dispensing the commitment to completeness and leaving out a few of the less successful poems. Fun to read, regardless.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Crumrine

    Peter Davis is probably the most transparent poet I have ever read. While he may come across as conceited at first, in the end Poetry! Poetry! Poetry! winds up being as much about why people consume/create poetry in the first place as Davis's own desperate need for approval. These poems effortless straddle the boundaries between being funny, inspirational, and just kind sad. They're true to life, and they've helped me be more honest with myself and more realistic in the way I read, write, and ap Peter Davis is probably the most transparent poet I have ever read. While he may come across as conceited at first, in the end Poetry! Poetry! Poetry! winds up being as much about why people consume/create poetry in the first place as Davis's own desperate need for approval. These poems effortless straddle the boundaries between being funny, inspirational, and just kind sad. They're true to life, and they've helped me be more honest with myself and more realistic in the way I read, write, and appreciate poems. A very, very good book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    J.A.

    This book is a show-stopper. Clever, hilarious, self-effacing. I adored it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Holly Amos

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ch'Boi

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tony

  15. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amit

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alysha

  18. 5 out of 5

    Don Gochenour

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael Meyerhofer

  21. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Belz

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bailey

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ryon

  25. 5 out of 5

    Justin Grimbol

  26. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

  27. 4 out of 5

    Darla Malone

  28. 5 out of 5

    Miza Marzuki

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rodolfo Vitangcol

  30. 5 out of 5

    Triana

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