Hot Best Seller

Visions of Tomorrow: Science Fiction Predictions that Came True

Availability: Ready to download

A fascinating collection of fiction-turned-reality tales. Long before movies like Minority Report and The Matrix, the world’s writers have been recording the future as it might exist—and as it turns out, they were right. This bizarre anthology collects the most stunning predictions and imagined inventions here for the first time. Visions of Tomorrow includes “The Land Iron A fascinating collection of fiction-turned-reality tales. Long before movies like Minority Report and The Matrix, the world’s writers have been recording the future as it might exist—and as it turns out, they were right. This bizarre anthology collects the most stunning predictions and imagined inventions here for the first time. Visions of Tomorrow includes “The Land Iron Clads” by H. G. Wells, who described a military tank in 1903—long before it was ever a possibility; “The Yesterday House” by Fritz Leiber, who writes about cloned humans; “Reason” by Isaac Asimov, who predicted solar power could be harnessed by satellites; and many more. In this stunning anthology of never-before-collected stories, our world’s greatest science fiction writers demonstrate that the truth can be just as strange as fiction.


Compare

A fascinating collection of fiction-turned-reality tales. Long before movies like Minority Report and The Matrix, the world’s writers have been recording the future as it might exist—and as it turns out, they were right. This bizarre anthology collects the most stunning predictions and imagined inventions here for the first time. Visions of Tomorrow includes “The Land Iron A fascinating collection of fiction-turned-reality tales. Long before movies like Minority Report and The Matrix, the world’s writers have been recording the future as it might exist—and as it turns out, they were right. This bizarre anthology collects the most stunning predictions and imagined inventions here for the first time. Visions of Tomorrow includes “The Land Iron Clads” by H. G. Wells, who described a military tank in 1903—long before it was ever a possibility; “The Yesterday House” by Fritz Leiber, who writes about cloned humans; “Reason” by Isaac Asimov, who predicted solar power could be harnessed by satellites; and many more. In this stunning anthology of never-before-collected stories, our world’s greatest science fiction writers demonstrate that the truth can be just as strange as fiction.

30 review for Visions of Tomorrow: Science Fiction Predictions that Came True

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    “Finlay’s Law: Trouble comes at three AM.” Regular readers of science fiction understand how risky projecting future trends of science and technology, not to mention sociology. But SF writers have been amazingly close on several things, as documented in this volume, published in 2008. “Now people’s lives can be turned upside-down with a few keystrokes. Information has no mass.” Not bad as anthologies go, keeping in mind that the accuracy of the forecast is the criterion for selection, not the quali “Finlay’s Law: Trouble comes at three AM.” Regular readers of science fiction understand how risky projecting future trends of science and technology, not to mention sociology. But SF writers have been amazingly close on several things, as documented in this volume, published in 2008. “Now people’s lives can be turned upside-down with a few keystrokes. Information has no mass.” Not bad as anthologies go, keeping in mind that the accuracy of the forecast is the criterion for selection, not the quality of the writing. And howling errors abound. Yes, people in the 1960s were told the world’s population would surpass twenty billion early in the twenty-first century, then society (and population) would collapse. “A few years of minimal breeding will not hurt this planet any. There are about nineteen and a half billion too many people on Earth already.” Since some stories hark back half a century or more, politically incorrectness abounds. The thin-skinned and hypersensitive are forewarned. “If there’s a rule about deals with the devil, it’s that you don’t realize you’re making one at the time.”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Strong

    DNF 19% - Introduction was good, couldn't get into the first 3 stories, reading someone's talk about the stories was more interesting than reading them myself DNF 19% - Introduction was good, couldn't get into the first 3 stories, reading someone's talk about the stories was more interesting than reading them myself

  3. 5 out of 5

    Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides

    I felt like reading the information about the stories was more interesting than reading the stories themselves.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick DiJusto

    Too many people think that science fiction's job is to predict the future. Of course, science fiction has no such requirement. But there have been a few times when a science fiction story has proved to be remarkably prescient of a future event or trend. This anthology is a collection of those stories. For example, were you aware that in May 1970, Gregory Benford wrote a story about a criminal who wrote a computer program that would copy itself to another computer, which would copy itself to anot Too many people think that science fiction's job is to predict the future. Of course, science fiction has no such requirement. But there have been a few times when a science fiction story has proved to be remarkably prescient of a future event or trend. This anthology is a collection of those stories. For example, were you aware that in May 1970, Gregory Benford wrote a story about a criminal who wrote a computer program that would copy itself to another computer, which would copy itself to another computer, which would copy itself to another computer. And that the program was called VIRUS and the antidote (which only the criminal could sell) was called VACCINE? Or of Cleve Cartmill's 1944 story that explained how Uranium-235 could be used to create a bomb that worked by nuclear fission, once you developed a way to extract the 235, and to keep it separated until the time of implosion. That story was so accurate the FBI got involved, worried that cartmill was a spy, until scientists at the Manhattan Project reassured them that anyone with a small amount of physics knowledge could have written the story. The other stories in this book are of a similar nature, with the best probably being Murray Leinster's "A Logic Named Joe". In a few thousand words, Leinster predicts home computers, a worldwide network of those computers, and a comprehensive search engine linking all the knowledge in those computers. He also predicts predicts videocalls, loss of privacy, phishing, spam, and "the comments". And he did this all in 1946.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Its a collection of Sci-Fi from different writers that were surprisingly correct about future prediction like technology, medical advancement etc etc.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leroy Erickson

    "Visions of Tomorrow" is a collection of science fiction stories which correctly predicted future developments, in some cases in a surprising fashion. Here are my opinions of each of the stories, along with the year in which they were originally printed. The Balloon Hoax by Edgar Allan Poe (1844) - 3 stars - This story was, apparently, originally printed in newspapers as a true story and only later exposed as a hoax. The idea of a manned balloon accidentally crossing the Atlantic Ocean in only 3 "Visions of Tomorrow" is a collection of science fiction stories which correctly predicted future developments, in some cases in a surprising fashion. Here are my opinions of each of the stories, along with the year in which they were originally printed. The Balloon Hoax by Edgar Allan Poe (1844) - 3 stars - This story was, apparently, originally printed in newspapers as a true story and only later exposed as a hoax. The idea of a manned balloon accidentally crossing the Atlantic Ocean in only 3 days was enough within reason that people believed it. Since the story was written as a "journal" of the trip, it's kind of dry reading. The Land Ironclads by H G Wells (1903) - 3 stars - Wells describes the use of iron tanks, before they were first used in World War I. Deadline by Clive Cartmill (1944) - 5 stars - The author described the construction and operation of an atomic bomb in such detail that the FBI became involved. They investigated the author and the magazine in which it was printed to find out who was leaking details of the secret Manhattan Project. Only when the author showed that most of the details had been printed in scientific journals years before was the investigation dropped. The Prize of Peril by Robert Sheckley (1958) - 4 stars - Reality TV shows described in 1958, including legal killing. Directed Energy by Jeff Hecht (2006) - 4 stars - A man constructs a laser mosquito zapper using recycled satellite weapons technology. Matchmaker by Thomas Easton (1990) - 3 stars - Using genetic modifications and computer controls to modify animals to replace construction and transportation equipment. A Logic Named Joe by Murray Leinster (1946) - 5 stars - Leinster describes how home computers are used to replace TVs (remote vision systems) and telephones (videophones, actually) and make use of world-wide information system (the internet?) in 1946! This was when only a couple of computers existed in the world and TVs were just being developed! The Scarred Man by Gregory Benford (1970) - 4 stars - The development of a computer virus to blackmail a company. The Infodict by James Van Pelt (2001) - 5 stars - Cell phone (or PDA) addiction and Google glasses in 2001. EMage by Rajnar Vajra (1999) - 5 stars - Identity theft which is reversed by entering the cyber world. How We Saved the Human Race by David Gerrold (1972) - 3 stars - Mass infection of fertility prevention, with a major homophobic attitude in society. Misprint by Vonda N. McIntyre (2008) - 3 stars - 3-D printing of genetically modified pets. OK, but just a little too cute. Excellence by Richard A. Lovett (2009) - 4 stars - Well developed idea of using gene manipulation in adults to optimize performance in sports. The Mechanic by Hal Clement (1966) - 3 stars - Genetically modified sea creatures and extreme use of DNA knowledge to regrow injured portions of the human body. Skystalk by Charles Sheffield (1979) - 5 stars - Another author's view of the space elevator. There are enough really good stories to make up for the not so good ones.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    After reading a couple of the stories, found that they weren't to my tastes, so moved on to other books that had to be read quickly because they were due back at the library. Nothing bad to say about this book, rather enjoyed the Foreword, just not enough time in the day to spend it forcing myself to read a book, especially when I have a pile of tbr's screaming 'read me' in my room. = ) After reading a couple of the stories, found that they weren't to my tastes, so moved on to other books that had to be read quickly because they were due back at the library. Nothing bad to say about this book, rather enjoyed the Foreword, just not enough time in the day to spend it forcing myself to read a book, especially when I have a pile of tbr's screaming 'read me' in my room. = )

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mary Louise

    On my booklist for a course that I will be teaching in the Spring. It's about science fiction writing as prophecy (creative problem solving!) On my booklist for a course that I will be teaching in the Spring. It's about science fiction writing as prophecy (creative problem solving!)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carma Spence

    You can read my review of the book here: http://www.thegenretraveler.com/sci-f... You can read my review of the book here: http://www.thegenretraveler.com/sci-f...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Donna Riley-lein

    Fun for fans If you like "hard" SF, this is the book for you. A good review of SF past. More than worth your time. Fun for fans If you like "hard" SF, this is the book for you. A good review of SF past. More than worth your time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    LoudVal

    Really enjoyed seeing how far we've come, and not. Really enjoyed seeing how far we've come, and not.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karina

    This was really good. There are some classic stories I've heard about but never before read. Only one of the stories I remembered (the one by Sheckley, since I do enjoy his short stories). This was really good. There are some classic stories I've heard about but never before read. Only one of the stories I remembered (the one by Sheckley, since I do enjoy his short stories).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert Knudsen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tamsen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  20. 5 out of 5

    Steven Piet

  21. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dianna

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Wright

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nick Chapin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daria

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristjan Okas

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan L

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kurt McNeely

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...