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The Complete Fairy Tales

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All of the magic and wonder of Hans Christian Andersen is brought to you in this elegant leather-bound edition. Reared in poverty, Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen created more than 200 folk and fairy tales beloved by countless generations of children—and adults. Featuring beautiful full-color illustrations and eye-catching end papers, you'll want to keep this book wh All of the magic and wonder of Hans Christian Andersen is brought to you in this elegant leather-bound edition. Reared in poverty, Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen created more than 200 folk and fairy tales beloved by countless generations of children—and adults. Featuring beautiful full-color illustrations and eye-catching end papers, you'll want to keep this book where everyone can see it. The Complete Fairy Tales: Hans Christian Andersen is part of Barnes & Noble's series of quality leather-bound volumes. Each title in the series presents a classic work in an attractively designed edition bound in genuine bonded leather.


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All of the magic and wonder of Hans Christian Andersen is brought to you in this elegant leather-bound edition. Reared in poverty, Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen created more than 200 folk and fairy tales beloved by countless generations of children—and adults. Featuring beautiful full-color illustrations and eye-catching end papers, you'll want to keep this book wh All of the magic and wonder of Hans Christian Andersen is brought to you in this elegant leather-bound edition. Reared in poverty, Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen created more than 200 folk and fairy tales beloved by countless generations of children—and adults. Featuring beautiful full-color illustrations and eye-catching end papers, you'll want to keep this book where everyone can see it. The Complete Fairy Tales: Hans Christian Andersen is part of Barnes & Noble's series of quality leather-bound volumes. Each title in the series presents a classic work in an attractively designed edition bound in genuine bonded leather.

30 review for The Complete Fairy Tales

  1. 4 out of 5

    Always Pouting

    Not a fan of Hans Christian Anderson at all. Most of his stories were short and pointless and the ones with morals made me feel like I was being preached to. I just can't get with the religious tone of his stories or the weird way women are treated like the little mermaid sacrificing herself off the boat, or the prince who tries to court the emperor's daughter but she rejects him so he pretends to be a swine herder and tricks her into getting disowned with him for kissing him and then basically Not a fan of Hans Christian Anderson at all. Most of his stories were short and pointless and the ones with morals made me feel like I was being preached to. I just can't get with the religious tone of his stories or the weird way women are treated like the little mermaid sacrificing herself off the boat, or the prince who tries to court the emperor's daughter but she rejects him so he pretends to be a swine herder and tricks her into getting disowned with him for kissing him and then basically leaves her homeless because that's what she deserves for rejecting an honest prince, or when the guy who journey's with the other guy beats the princess while following her and she thinks its a hail storm. I could go on and on. I literally did not get anything constructive from reading any of the stories and only finished reading the book because I have this compulsive need to finish a book once I start it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Luís

    Andersen's Tales are not tales. The proof is that sometimes it ends badly. Those who know the Walt Disney version, a cartoon for popcorn eaters, have not had access to the universe of this Danish storyteller who flirts with the unconscious of his readers by dragging them into his dreams and nightmares. Populated by street children, fabulous animals, hideous or evil creatures, his tales are closer to Edgar Poe than to the world of Care Bears. Andersen talks about our anxieties, our desires, our dif Andersen's Tales are not tales. The proof is that sometimes it ends badly. Those who know the Walt Disney version, a cartoon for popcorn eaters, have not had access to the universe of this Danish storyteller who flirts with the unconscious of his readers by dragging them into his dreams and nightmares. Populated by street children, fabulous animals, hideous or evil creatures, his tales are closer to Edgar Poe than to the world of Care Bears. Andersen talks about our anxieties, our desires, our difficult path to beauty and truth, pure souls who struggle against discouragement, fear, darkness, stupidity, contempt. He does it as a poet, not as a moralist or a philosopher; he does it with humour, irony, tenderness or melancholy. He speaks to the hearts and the imagination, with shepherdesses and tin soldiers, nightingales and swallows. Eye Ole Farm Week or Little Ida's Flowers are my favourites. They open the door to the imagination for those who want to make themselves small enough and enter it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eldonfoil TH*E Whatever Champion

    Strangely, despite four decades on Earth, I have almost no familiarity with this gentleman Hans. If I can live another 4 decades, I doubt I'll forget about him from here on out. What is most generally striking/perplexing to me is how these stories came to be known as children tales, came to be widely accepted and popular rather than scorned. I don't think it's just my glasses that view Hans Christian Andersen as a soul that senses more darkness than light. “Yes, every year the trees have new, fr Strangely, despite four decades on Earth, I have almost no familiarity with this gentleman Hans. If I can live another 4 decades, I doubt I'll forget about him from here on out. What is most generally striking/perplexing to me is how these stories came to be known as children tales, came to be widely accepted and popular rather than scorned. I don't think it's just my glasses that view Hans Christian Andersen as a soul that senses more darkness than light. “Yes, every year the trees have new, fresh leaves, but that is not true of the human heart.” (From a Window in Vartov) HCA desperately wants and loves beauty, yearns for music and poetry and life and innocence, and so we get this at the center of so many of his tales, but at the same time it is mostly apparent that these ideals are but dreams that we must continually reach for, work for, cherish when they sparingly come, because what this world is really filled with is darkness. He seems to say, feel both beauty and evil, know them both, accept them both, but my heart pains that the former will never have the upper hand. Throughout his tales I find his dreamy poetics are amazingly served with a shimmering personal touch; they are not distant, community-built folktales. There are also wonderful juxtapositions, magical paradoxes, and a communicative simplicity that can travel, like a drop in the lake, as deeply as the reader wishes to take things. At the same time, there are many stories of a different breed which will never make it to Disney. Stories like Two Virgins/Two Maidens, In the Duck Yard, and The Cock and the Weathercock dish out satire as sharp as any I've ever encountered. Sharp not only in its depth of understanding, but also in both heavy-handedness and bitterness. Word play, symbolism, and connections in these stories are as far from innocence and naivete as you will find. Other not so well-known stories such as A Drop of Water and The Shadow are probably my favorites so far. Both are extremely intense and particularly revelatory regarding how HCA views human behavior and human nature. Very direct, dark and twisted, but done in unique and colorful ways, they continue to show that HCA was not a simple children's man or the one-trick pony that permeates much of his recognition. And at some point, I don’t recall exactly when, I began to think a lot of Kafka while reading HCA. What are the connections? In a time when the construction of myths and fairy tales is practically extinct, when even the originals are mostly watered down and considered antiquated, Mr. Andersen delivered his most pleasant winds not so long ago and they stretch back to not only the earliest of human experience, but also connect just as strongly to us sensitives amongst moderns. This is a tome to keep bedside, never finishing, never repeating.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Today, Hans Christian Andersen would be given drugs and therapy, and then more drugs. He would be put into a study about repressed homosexuals and boys with a mamma fixation. All this because of his stories. Andersen’s stories are also not very happy when you truly think about them. For every happy story, like “The Ugly Duckling”, there are at least two sad stories. Yet Andersen, at least in American circles, is considered a children’s author. Whether this is due to those editions or retellings Today, Hans Christian Andersen would be given drugs and therapy, and then more drugs. He would be put into a study about repressed homosexuals and boys with a mamma fixation. All this because of his stories. Andersen’s stories are also not very happy when you truly think about them. For every happy story, like “The Ugly Duckling”, there are at least two sad stories. Yet Andersen, at least in American circles, is considered a children’s author. Whether this is due to those editions or retellings of Andersen’s stories that make the ending happy, I don’t know. I do know that I have read Andersen more times than I have read the Brothers Grimm and that Andersen speaks to more people than the Grimm brothers ever will. The Grimms were interested in collecting folktales and folklore. Andersen is interested in telling stories. Outside of Demark and other northern countries, he is known for his stories, in particular for his fairy stories. This is misleading for Andersen also wrote plays and poems as well as travelogues and autobiographies. His first success wasn’t with his fairy stories. His poem about a mother mourning her dead children is touching (and a theme that enters into one of his tales). Even just considering his stories, people are misled. Everyone thinks they know “The Little Mermaid,” “The Ugly Duckling”, or “The Little Match Girl”, fewer people know the stories how they actually are and even fewer know more of Andersen’s work, such as “The Shadow” or ‘”The Storks”. This does Andersen a huge injustice. Andersen was heavily influenced by several things in his writing. It is common knowledge that he was influenced by folklore and the stories told to him by his grandmother, but he was also influenced by the German writers that predated him or who were his contemporaries. While it is not apparent in his better known tales, he had a strong love of country (even though he always seemed to be traveling away from it) as well as a good dose of patriotism. He was also religious, though this seems to come though in his tale more than anything else. Several critics have pointed out that Andersen has a cult of suffering. His leads his heroes and heroines always suffer. The Ugly Duckling gets frozen in water, the Little Mermaid feels as if she is walking on knives (or broken glass); the Marsh King’s Daughter is transformed into a frog, the little Match Girl freezes to death, the money pig breaks, the storks deliver dead babies. Andersen’s characters seem to suffer far more than those people in the Grimm’s tales (though that isn’t a cake walk either). Andersen, however, is still a considered a children’s author because of the tone, his use of sound (read his tales aloud if you don’t believe me), of putting himself in a child’s shoes (who doesn’t imagine the flowers coming to life). Too often people look at Andersen in the simplest terms. Take “The Little Mermaid” for example. Many today know the story not as Andersen’s but as Disney’s. They think that the mermaid marries her prince and everyone lives happily ever after. While the cursory reader of Andersen knows that this is not the ending, a deeper reading reveals, if not a happy ending, perhaps a slightly hopeful one as well as a few details about the prince. In the mermaid’s story, Andersen presents a people where the women seem to help each (the witch, the mermaid’s sisters, the mermaid herself) and where the only male who does anything is the prince himself. The mermaid and her sisters are desexualized (she loses her voice, they their hair). The prince treats the mermaid like his pet dog. The mermaid, however, wants a soul more than a prince. She acts more as if she has a soul more than prince. By taking “The Little Mermaid” and reducing the plot to a love story, the adaptor or reader does Andersen a disservice and dismisses the larger issue. In the story, it is the non-humans, the merfolk, who appear to have those virtues that humanity claims – compassion. The mermaid might eventually get her soul though she doesn’t get her prince. Today, there is a movement to de-religion stores (look at Narnia in both the movies and the exhibit), but to do so to Andersen guts this story. Or take “The Marsh King’s Daughter”, one of Andersen’s lesser known popular tales. Fairy Tales always treat rape as a non issue or blame the victim. Sleeping Beauty, for example, in some versions is woken by the birth of twins, yet never seems to feel any emotional upheaval. Andersen is one of the few fairy tale writers to deal with the issue of rape and not fully gloss over it. Like the Grimms, who buried the incest theme of some tales, Andersen glosses over the attack that starts “The Marsh King’s Daughter”. The daughter of the title is the offspring of the Marsh King and the Egyptian princess who he attacks. This daughter is full of rage and pain except at night when she becomes a frog. Part of the story is about the daughter coming to terms with this rage. Where else would the rage come off except for the attack on the mother? Many of Andersen’s tales are concerned with relationships, in particular those of mothers and children. Many critics have discovered or argued for the presence of Andersen’s own relationship with his mother in these tales. Andersen’s mother, who gave birth to a bastard daughter before marrying Andersen’s father, comes off looking less like a saint and more like a drunk if this is true. But then, there is a tale like “She Was a Good for Nothing” where the mother is a drunk who dearly loves and cares for her son. In this story, Andersen contrasts public view versus private life, of how the upper class views the lower class. Andersen is often concerned with class in his tales. The upper classes tend to be dismissive of the lower classes, though it is the lower classes that exhibit more of those human virtues. Sometimes, like in “The Tinderbox”, Andersen even seems to attack the royalty, seemingly suggesting that the old order must give to the new. Even in his class stories, Andersen also shows a great love and knowledge of his country. Some of his stories are about the humble beginnings of Great Danes (no, not the dogs) like Thorvaldsen, whose work Andersen seemed to love if Andersen’s stories are anything to go by. It should also be noted that in some of stories, especially in stories where different classes of children met, Andersen suggests more of equality than out and out class warfare. Andersen’s stories aren’t all for children; in fact, as he wrote more stories, Andersen saw himself as writing more for adults and this would example the class conscious stories, but also the longer stories like “The Ice Maiden” or “Ib and Little Christine”. It is in the longer stories that one can see the German romantic influence on Andersen. While the tales are more adult, they also consider several of the same themes that inhabit his more child friendly stories. While “Ib and Little Christine” can be rather annoying if you are female reader, it is impossible to describe the creeping feeling of unease that stories such as “The Ice Maiden” and “The Shadow” inspire. Andersen borrowed from more than his grandmother and the Germans. His “The Rose Elf” presents a revenge minded “Pot of Basil”, a twist on a familiar tale presented by Boccaccio but also used by Keats among others. Andersen’s variation of the “Seven Swans” makes far more sense than other versions, even if it is chaster than those other versions. Andersen’s most famous story might be “The Ugly Duckling”, a story that many critics, rightly it seems, consider to be Andersen’s most autobiographical work. This isn’t to say that the similar theme of belonging, of fitting in, doesn’t appear in other works. There are shades of “Duckling” in “Thumbelina” as well as some of the class conscious Andersen short stories. “The Ugly Duckling” is more memorable because the plot of the story could happen. The plot of “Thumbelina”, not so much. We believe in the duckling becoming the swan because of the way Andersen sets up the story – a mistake could happen. Today, even with all our supposed advancements, you still have hospital mix ups. In most of Andersen’s stories, the reader can meet actual places and people that Andersen knew or admired. Edvard Collin, Andersen’s man crush, appears, as does Jenny Lind. Even smaller characters in Andersen’s history, less well known to the average reader, seem to appear. Andersen’s teachers, the women Andersen felt rejected him (or whom Andersen allowed himself to be rejected by); all seem to appear. Copenhagen is a time honored companion in the stories, but so is Andersen’s love of Italy. This sense of place gives another level of reality to the tales, a level that seems to be missing from the works of the Grimms or Perrault. While many of Andersen’s tales have “morals” or lessons, they are not spelled out as in the work of Aesop or Fontatine. Andersen respects his reader, be that reader a child or an adult, and knows that his reader can follow his lesson without the moral being directly spelled out. Perhaps it is this reason that examines Andersen’s staying power even among, or especially among, female readers. Andersen’s female characters do seem to get punished at far steeper rate than his male characters. While it is true that the Ugly Duckling freezes, his end is far different than those ends of the girls in “The Little Match Girl”, “The Red Shoes” or “The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf”. To say that Andersen was sexist would be a mistake. Even in stories where the girl is horribly punished there are good women – the grandmother, the girl who prays for Karen. More importantly, one of Andersen’s most famous stories, “The Snow Queen” presents two strong willed girls, one of whom keeps her independence; another of women is helped by more women than man when she quests to save her childhood fan who also is perhaps her adult love or husband. The statue of the Little Mermaid, which just recently had its birthday, in many ways, is a fitting and unfitting memorial to Andersen. Like Andersen himself, the statue has survived various attempts to deface it. Andersen faults against those who mocked him, who tried to educate the imagination out of him, or who ignored him because of his class. He survived the fact that he would not be able to fulfill his first dream, to be a dancer. The statue of the mermaid has overcome beheadings, defacing, and veils to still exist as a tourist attraction. But like the works of Andersen’s own works, few people who see the statue know true story of the character the statue is based on, few know the story of the statue itself or of the Kasslett located nearby. Fewer know that it is not the only statue in Copenhagen depicting a merperson that has connection to Andersen (he wrote a story based on the Forsake Merman). Perhaps it is this sense of mystery that keeps Andersen’s popularity. We are introduced to him at two points in our lives. The first time when we are children. The second time when we are older, perhaps after seeing the statue or reading a story to a child. We can have two different readings of Andersen, the man and his work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    (Finished reading February 25, 2019) Thanks to the power you hold via Goodreads, though you may forget something you’ve logged in, you can then be reminded of it: a joyful thing. Right now I'm referring to my childhood copy of https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5... (which doesn't contain all of Andersen's tales though it's combined on Goodreads as if it does). Of those in this current volume I decided to read only the stories I hadn’t read in this edition, https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1.. (Finished reading February 25, 2019) Thanks to the power you hold via Goodreads, though you may forget something you’ve logged in, you can then be reminded of it: a joyful thing. Right now I'm referring to my childhood copy of https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5... (which doesn't contain all of Andersen's tales though it's combined on Goodreads as if it does). Of those in this current volume I decided to read only the stories I hadn’t read in this edition, https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1..., so I thought I was reading only the tales I hadn't read before. Au contraire. Looking at the description of the childhood copy (which I no longer physically own), I see it contains a few I didn’t remember, including "The Shoes of Fortune," called "The Galoshes of Fortune" in this collection, a story that didn’t even seem vaguely familiar. Reading the more obscure tales might be an eye-opener for some. Sure, they can be sad and sentimental, like "The Little Match Girl" (one of my favorites); but they are also downright wacky, especially the descriptions of morbid flowers, trees and other mutant-like growths of nature. The man’s imagination was off the charts. If he'd lived in a different time period, we would've thought he was dropping acid.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Van

    Should an apocalypse ever befall, this is the first book I'm putting in my survival bag. I don't think I can properly review this book, and I don't intend to. However, I cannot be silent about it when it had had such an impact on me. The Complete Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen encompass all beauty, darkness, and light there is in the world - in the human soul. These are charming stories for everyone of every age. Some tales are happy, and some are very, very sad. Yet they are beautifully w Should an apocalypse ever befall, this is the first book I'm putting in my survival bag. I don't think I can properly review this book, and I don't intend to. However, I cannot be silent about it when it had had such an impact on me. The Complete Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen encompass all beauty, darkness, and light there is in the world - in the human soul. These are charming stories for everyone of every age. Some tales are happy, and some are very, very sad. Yet they are beautifully written with a kind hand, from an honest, sensitive (broken) heart through an astonishing imagination. These pages bring you adventure, romance, cruelty, love, loss, gain, acceptance, mistakes, fear, courage, pain, death, life... So much life. And it's magical. It's true. It's the beating heart of Andersen. It's the heart of us all.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sidharth Vardhan

    “Everything you look at can become a fairy tale and you can get a story from everything you touch.” Anderson really could make children's stories out of anything. The best stories sometimes had a sad ending to them. Anderson also probably had a lot of imagination even though some of the stories contained in here might not be best for little kids - far from happily ever afters their Disney-ised versions. Although it was always going to be a five-star book because of some amazing stories, the autho “Everything you look at can become a fairy tale and you can get a story from everything you touch.” Anderson really could make children's stories out of anything. The best stories sometimes had a sad ending to them. Anderson also probably had a lot of imagination even though some of the stories contained in here might not be best for little kids - far from happily ever afters their Disney-ised versions. Although it was always going to be a five-star book because of some amazing stories, the author's religious values spoil some others. There is also a lot of Christian cruelty in many of these stories (I should have seen it coming, 'Christian' is literally the author's middle name) where good people including children are punished with years of misery for very small acts of folly.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Noelle

    Beautifully selected works set in a fantastic translation, Hans Christian Anderson’s The Complete Fairy Tales and Stories is a wonderful introduction to the author’s work. His famous works are included and the translations are just as engaging as Anderson’s original tales. What is pertinent about Anderson’s work is his descriptions and gift for imagery. For example, in ‘The Little Mermaid’ Anderson opens his story by describing the colors and textures of the undersea kingdom that is both lyrical Beautifully selected works set in a fantastic translation, Hans Christian Anderson’s The Complete Fairy Tales and Stories is a wonderful introduction to the author’s work. His famous works are included and the translations are just as engaging as Anderson’s original tales. What is pertinent about Anderson’s work is his descriptions and gift for imagery. For example, in ‘The Little Mermaid’ Anderson opens his story by describing the colors and textures of the undersea kingdom that is both lyrical and vivid, “The waters are as blue as the petals of the cornflower and as clear as glass.…” Anderson’s ability to write diversely while remaining fresh is also a noticeable trait. His stories relate about orphans, oriental clockwork birds, and toy soldiers, each aiming to entertain, to educate on life lessons, or to illuminate on morality and mortal philosophies. The arrangement and organization of the stories are aptly crafted, as is the flow and pacing of each story. Though the pacing varies from tale to tale, such can be seen in ‘The Snow Queen,’ and “The Little Match Girl,’ the quality of the stories, in language and substance, make up for the structure. This collection is universally enjoyable and capable of variety and thoughtful insight. Anderson’s tales prove that children need not settle for simplicity or repetitive formulas; they are worthy of substance and intellectual care.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I am currently working my way through this monstrously large collection of tales (there are 156 in over a thousand pages). They are a nice antidote to other books I am reading. There are well-known favorites like The Little Mermaid and The Ugly Duckling as well as many you will have never heard of, like The Magic Galoshes and Auntie Toothache. Hans Christian Andersen's writing style is unique and well-suited to reading aloud. The descriptions of landscape and setting are articulate, vivid and im I am currently working my way through this monstrously large collection of tales (there are 156 in over a thousand pages). They are a nice antidote to other books I am reading. There are well-known favorites like The Little Mermaid and The Ugly Duckling as well as many you will have never heard of, like The Magic Galoshes and Auntie Toothache. Hans Christian Andersen's writing style is unique and well-suited to reading aloud. The descriptions of landscape and setting are articulate, vivid and imaginative. The characters show surprising insight into people's emotions with little idiosyncrasies that the Grimm fairy tales didn't have. As far as content goes, they are generally light, though they frequently feature death. There is nothing really disturbing like in the German Brothers Grimm collection (just Google Hans Dumm or The Children Who Played Butcher). Overall, I really enjoy these, even though I don't have any children to read them to. I only wish they had illustrations (there may be some editions that have them, but mine doesn't).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Éimhear (A Little Haze)

    Enchanting. Some of my all time favourite fairytales Over the course of a few months this year, I decided to go back and reread each of Hans Christian Andersen's fairytales in a fabulous hardback that my mum and dad bought for me when I was a little girl. It's an utterly gorgeous book. I read it from cover to cover and back again a million times over as a child yet I kept it extremely well and was careful to not damage it because to me it was the most exquisitely beautiful book I owned. I read it Enchanting. Some of my all time favourite fairytales Over the course of a few months this year, I decided to go back and reread each of Hans Christian Andersen's fairytales in a fabulous hardback that my mum and dad bought for me when I was a little girl. It's an utterly gorgeous book. I read it from cover to cover and back again a million times over as a child yet I kept it extremely well and was careful to not damage it because to me it was the most exquisitely beautiful book I owned. I read it almost with a hushed reverence and I still get those same feelings when I read it now as an adult. The fairytales contained within are timeless. I find it hard to choose my favourites but I think The Little Match Girl, Thumbelina, The Snow Queen, The Nightingale and The Little Sea Maid (Aka the little mermaid) are probably the ones that mean the most to me.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andreea Reads

    Truth is... I'm a sucker for fairy-tales! I can't help it and I'm always going back to reading these from time to time. It's almost like an escape, like a refuge....so It is. Truth is... I'm a sucker for fairy-tales! I can't help it and I'm always going back to reading these from time to time. It's almost like an escape, like a refuge....so It is.

  12. 4 out of 5

    James

    This is a rather charming volume that takes a little effort to wade through if tales of the lives of trees, thimbles, candles, and obscure (to Westerners) European and Scandinavian history aren't your usual fare. Ask anyone on the street what their favourite Andersen story is, and they will likely reply, "Disney's 'Little Mermaid' was fun and had sweet music." Some may mention the Emperor's New Clothes, or The Ugly Duckling. After reading his complete works, my conclusion is that Andersen's famo This is a rather charming volume that takes a little effort to wade through if tales of the lives of trees, thimbles, candles, and obscure (to Westerners) European and Scandinavian history aren't your usual fare. Ask anyone on the street what their favourite Andersen story is, and they will likely reply, "Disney's 'Little Mermaid' was fun and had sweet music." Some may mention the Emperor's New Clothes, or The Ugly Duckling. After reading his complete works, my conclusion is that Andersen's famous stories aren't necessarily his best. Over the nearly thousand pages, there are the stories of inanimate objects and tales of Tycho Brahe's exploits that I alluded to earlier, beast fables, fairy tales, and heart-wrenching stories of unrequited love. His fairy tales (stories with elves, goblins, and princesses), are excellent, but sadly far too few, filling probably less than a quarter of the total works. I'm not sure how many people are aware of just how many stories Andersen wrote that are tragic in every sense of the word. There is probably a reason these stories aren't as well-known in today's age where the beauty of childhood is extolled; I think a lot of people have missed the reality that childhood is no longer idyllic and many children live very tragic lives. For this reason, I believe these tragic pieces should be read, that they may touch a new generation. Honestly speaking, reading them broke my heart and made me weep. I am giving this book four stars because there were too many stories that were, in a word, superfluous. For those looking for literature suitable for children, or those who are desiring fanciful stories with a strong religious slant, I would recommend this book-- Highly. For the casual reader, you are probably better off with a book of selected tales.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I read these fairy tales slowly through my life and I recently finished reading them all. Each of them are unique. I hated some but I also loved a lot of them. My favorite has to be the Snow Queen. It is probably one of the longest fairy tales written/recorded by Hans Christian Andersen, but it is also one of the most deep and symbolic of the tales. I loved it so much I read it multiple times. In my opinion, Andersen's Fairy Tales were good, but they don't come close to topping Grimm's Fairy Tal I read these fairy tales slowly through my life and I recently finished reading them all. Each of them are unique. I hated some but I also loved a lot of them. My favorite has to be the Snow Queen. It is probably one of the longest fairy tales written/recorded by Hans Christian Andersen, but it is also one of the most deep and symbolic of the tales. I loved it so much I read it multiple times. In my opinion, Andersen's Fairy Tales were good, but they don't come close to topping Grimm's Fairy Tales. Grimm's Fairy Tales will always be my favorite.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melanti

    I really enjoyed HCA's more famous stories - "The Little Mermaid", "The Steadfast Tin Soldier", "The Emperor's New Clothes", and others... My edition arranged the stories in chronological order -- as good an order as any I suppose -- but it made it very apparent how much HCA's style changed over the years. His earlier stories actually have a story to them, while his later ones have a lot more whimsy and a lot less plot. He focuses more on inanimate objects than on people. Unfortunately, the furth I really enjoyed HCA's more famous stories - "The Little Mermaid", "The Steadfast Tin Soldier", "The Emperor's New Clothes", and others... My edition arranged the stories in chronological order -- as good an order as any I suppose -- but it made it very apparent how much HCA's style changed over the years. His earlier stories actually have a story to them, while his later ones have a lot more whimsy and a lot less plot. He focuses more on inanimate objects than on people. Unfortunately, the further along he got in his life, the more explicitly Christian in themes he became. It was always there -- he almost never has "magic" or "fairy godmothers" in his stories. Instead, he has angels coming down from Heaven and performing miracles because the characters are virtuous. But as he progresses in his career he progresses from Christian themes (which I'm perfectly happy with) to flat out proselytizing (which I can't stand). It's sort of like he feels that any story is incomplete unless it explicitly mentions (if not outright worships) God. For instance, "The Pen and Inkstand" started out as a quaint argument between a pen and a pot of ink over who could take more credit for writing down poems. Then, in the last few paragraphs, it became preachy -- just as the ink pot and pen are tools of the poet in his work, we're tools of God in his. Yuck. Or, so many of the characters die... and the general feeling I get from reading the stories as a whole is that HCA believes that this is a happy ending because they go to heaven and live in paradise for eternity. No, sorry. They're dead. That's not a happy ending at all! I much prefer the other fairy tales "happily ever after" on THIS earth to Andersen's "and they suffered until they died, but heaven exists and isn't that grand?" The all too common themes of "suffer until you get to heaven, then it'll be okay" makes me think of that quote by Karl Marx: "Religious distress is at the same time the expression of real distress and the protest against real distress. Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, just as it is the spirit of a spiritless situation. It is the opium of the people." 5 stars for the more famous stories from the beginning of his career and 2 stars for the other 800 pages that came after that!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Phil Jensen

    A few insufficient comments on the Haugaard translation of all 156 tales and stories. * I spent 10 months working my way through the 1100+ pages of this volume, and it still felt like more than I really wanted. If I had it to do over, I would choose a translation with 30 or so tales instead. * There are very few clinkers. Maybe 5 or so stories are actually bad. The rest range from okay to excellent. My fatigue was not related to the quality of the stories so much as the sheer number of them. * Some A few insufficient comments on the Haugaard translation of all 156 tales and stories. * I spent 10 months working my way through the 1100+ pages of this volume, and it still felt like more than I really wanted. If I had it to do over, I would choose a translation with 30 or so tales instead. * There are very few clinkers. Maybe 5 or so stories are actually bad. The rest range from okay to excellent. My fatigue was not related to the quality of the stories so much as the sheer number of them. * Some readers complain about the talking inanimate objects. It's true that there are a lot of talking barrels, sticks, coins, etc., but the tales are usually playful parables and not grating. I think my favorite was the one about the lamp post. * Some readers comment that Andersen is more "grown up" than they expected. I'm not sure what they expected; even the realistic stories had a "Once upon a time" vibe to them. Many of them had a melancholy mood, which is also in keeping with fairy tales as a genre. * Relative to the Grimm's tales, I found HCA's to be less violent and more moral. For example, the ending of Grimm's "Rumpelstiltskin" is the thwarted dwarf screaming "The Devil made you do it!" and physically ripping his own body into two pieces. You won't find anything that insane in HCA. * In the end, I think the longer pieces, such as "Story of the Dunes" and "The Bog King's Daughter" were some of my favorites. HCA had an underused skill in depicting the changes in personalities over time and using later actions to comment on earlier events. * Apparently, this book is taught as serious literature in Denmark, and HCA is placed on a pedestal next to Hugo and Dickens. Let's not get carried away, Denmark. There's a difference between "consistently good" and "literary giant."

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    When I was little my aunt bought me a Chinese hardcover set. I didn't like it as much as Grimm at the time. There were a ton of footnotes in that translation explaining a lot of Danish background, and I couldn't appreciate how academic that was. There were a lot of dark themes that honestly were not that appropriate for children. Total classic that I can read again and again. I still have that hardcover set. Maybe one day someone will make a faithful adaptation of the Little Mermaid. When I was little my aunt bought me a Chinese hardcover set. I didn't like it as much as Grimm at the time. There were a ton of footnotes in that translation explaining a lot of Danish background, and I couldn't appreciate how academic that was. There were a lot of dark themes that honestly were not that appropriate for children. Total classic that I can read again and again. I still have that hardcover set. Maybe one day someone will make a faithful adaptation of the Little Mermaid.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Misty

    So much better than the Disney versions, the originals seem much more fractured than the remakes. The artwork in the hardcover version is beautifully done. Anyone who enjoys fairytales really should start from the beginning.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    I can’t do it anymore

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elinor Loredan

    On my first reading, I was disappointed that more stories don't revolve around castles, princesses, fairies, etc but rather a lot of them feature a realistic setting. Moreover, many of the stories end with characters dying. True, they go to heaven which is in a way a happy ending but harder to accept than fairy tale endings in which characters are happy here in this life. Non Christian readers might have a problem with how many of the stories center around Christianity, and even as a Lutheran I On my first reading, I was disappointed that more stories don't revolve around castles, princesses, fairies, etc but rather a lot of them feature a realistic setting. Moreover, many of the stories end with characters dying. True, they go to heaven which is in a way a happy ending but harder to accept than fairy tale endings in which characters are happy here in this life. Non Christian readers might have a problem with how many of the stories center around Christianity, and even as a Lutheran I find some of the theological concepts strange and contrary to what I believe. The first part of the book I absolutely love as it holds my favorite Andersen stories. There are some real gems that aren't well known--for instance, "The Talisman," "Little Ida's Flowers," "This Fable is Intended for You." As the book progresses, many of the stories become less uplifting, more confusing, and less like fairy tales. However, once I accepted that many of the stories are not like I was expecting and hoping for, most of them are interesting, enjoyable, or meaningful in some way. I feel like Andersen put full effort into each story, and therefore each deserves to be read and examined. Some of the stories I like even though they contain very bad morals. In "The Tinderbox," for instance, the soldier kills the witch for the magical tinderbox and then uses it to steal a princess away each night. I don't condone his way of gaining what he wants, but I do love the magic of the tree with its hidden chambers, of the tinderbox, and of the dogs it summons. Similarly, "Little Claus and Big Claus" is very entertaining even while I am repulsed by how Little Claus gets Big Claus to kill his horses and grandmother. I appreciate his cleverness, though, and laugh at how stupid the other people are. Favorites: -Little Ida's Flowers (Delightful imagery and childlike wonder) -Goblin and the Grocer (The constant tug of war between our physical selves and our spiritual selves) -The Talisman (Why is this one not better known? It reminds us that few of us are perfectly content and that we must choose to be so) -The Snow Queen (I love the idea of the devil's mirror. Some days I definitely feel like a shard is lodged in my eye! A story about the power of love. I'm not sure what the Snow Queen's role is, though...) -Emperor's New Clothes (So funny and true. Many of us keep quiet to avoid seeming stupid even though things are so obviously wrong) -Little Mermaid (Probably my very favorite--just wow. Incredible descriptions, imagination, and themes of love and sacrifice) -Thumbelina (This one is so cozy, and Thumbelina learns to make her own decisions about her life. People might mean well, but ultimately we need to do what feels right for us. I do feel bad for the "ugly" toads and the mother who is left bereft and never mentioned again.) -Old Lukoie (What magic! Especially when he makes trees grow in the bedroom and the little boy rides through the forest) -Travelling Companion (This one reads like a Grimm tale in which the male lead tries to win a princess. What I love most is the description of the evil sorcerer's cavern. Very vivid! I always hate princesses who let men die in the attempt to win them. I wonder if they symbolize reluctance to grow up?) -Garden of Paradise (Yes, we all would follow the woman and lose the garden) -Flying Trunk (A reminder that lying to aggrandize ourselves never turns out well) -Fir Tree (Andersen really knew how to animate objects that will elicit the most sympathy from readers. The poor Christmas tree! Most of us are just like him as we think that we will finally be happy when this or that happens and then look back and realize we had it all already) -Butterfly (Don't do something just for the sake of doing it, and also if we have ridiculously high standards we'll never find anyone. I enjoy the butterfly's assessment of each flower type) -What the Old Man Does is Always Right (No, I don't advocate women not questioning their husbands. It's just a funny, entertaining story that I think is more about supporting each other than about male supremacy) There are many more beautiful or entertaining stories, but these are my very favorites. Andersen had an incredible imagination. To fully appreciate his writing I need to pay much closer attention and read slower than I do Grimm or Lang, both of which are a lot lighter and more concise. Andersen must be slowly absorbed and pondered over.

  20. 5 out of 5

    I'mogén

    What a beast this was to get through... But my, what a beauty it was to read! (^ See what I did there...? ;D) The complete illustrated stories of Hans Christian Anderson fell nothing short of my high expectations. Of course I grew up reading and seeing film adaptations of some of his most famous works so being able to read his entirety (and finding it for only £1.99!) was a wondrous and nostalgic experience that I wish for everyone to try! I was shocked to see that not everything Mr. Anderson cre What a beast this was to get through... But my, what a beauty it was to read! (^ See what I did there...? ;D) The complete illustrated stories of Hans Christian Anderson fell nothing short of my high expectations. Of course I grew up reading and seeing film adaptations of some of his most famous works so being able to read his entirety (and finding it for only £1.99!) was a wondrous and nostalgic experience that I wish for everyone to try! I was shocked to see that not everything Mr. Anderson created was that of fairy-tales and was astonished to see that even a simple tale about a shilling pulled fond emotions from my heart and soul. I loved how the words flowed with the stories that I was familiar with (e.g. The little sea maid, Thumbelina, The snow queen, of which if you check out my progress updates you can see some little reviews of) and rekindled my love for some stories I had once forgotten. For example, whilst reading The Little Match girl I remembered how I had a cassette set with a lot of Anderson's work on them and it brought me back to the times where I'd take them out, sit at my desk at home, with my little red chair and tape player, and listen to them for hours! Ah! The memories! I did find it a struggle to get through some of the more unfamiliar stories, especially ones that were very different to what I'd usually read, but this doesn't in anyway cheapen the beauty of the tales, it just took a little more effort to read, therefore in most cases, increasing my appreciation. Some examples of ones that were a little difficult to read and slow to start but I ended up loving were Grandmother, Poultry Meg's Family and Under the willow tree. I was confused with if the whole of the stories after The Story of my life were still part of the autobiography, which would make sense if they were, but if so, almost felt detached somehow. The layout of the original text and illustrations complemented the stories beautiful and I'm so happy to have read all of Hans Christian Anderson's works from when he was just beginning and finding his feet to when he was soaring high with the best of them- which was enhanced through his autobiography! This is a special gem that I think everyone should read, whether you're just introducing The Little Mermaid to your young ones for the first time (perhaps with the censor on :P) or you're picking up some much beloved stories for the 500th time, just read it! :D There's so much more I can say, but can't put into words, so instead of stumbling on my words read Anderson's words instead! Pick it up, give it a go and enjoy! >(^_^)< Gén

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erika Free

    I am not sure if this is the one i have, but mine was similar to this. It had many of the stories in it, around 35 i think. Most of the stories i really liked, they had a great moral. I like the way that he writes, its very witty and fun. Some of the stories where a little gory-er then i would like, but they still where great stories. Some of the stories would basically state the moral in the story, for example, "The ugly duckling". But the others You have to think about it for awhile, until you I am not sure if this is the one i have, but mine was similar to this. It had many of the stories in it, around 35 i think. Most of the stories i really liked, they had a great moral. I like the way that he writes, its very witty and fun. Some of the stories where a little gory-er then i would like, but they still where great stories. Some of the stories would basically state the moral in the story, for example, "The ugly duckling". But the others You have to think about it for awhile, until you can take you best guess at what he meant. I do not have a particular favorite, but I think i enjoyed "The Girl who Trod on The Loaf" and "The Little Mermaid" the most.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    A classic and excellent collection of some of the world's best known fairy tales, alongside a plethora of lesser known tales by Hans Christian Anderson. Though many of the tales seem to end too abruptly, or dally along pointlessly, I thoroughly enjoy them all. Particularity the longer ones that are by Hans Christian Anderson himself; these tend to develop characters more deeply, and take a deeper dive into broader themes than a simple moral lesson like, "don't steal." I'd recommend this book to a A classic and excellent collection of some of the world's best known fairy tales, alongside a plethora of lesser known tales by Hans Christian Anderson. Though many of the tales seem to end too abruptly, or dally along pointlessly, I thoroughly enjoy them all. Particularity the longer ones that are by Hans Christian Anderson himself; these tend to develop characters more deeply, and take a deeper dive into broader themes than a simple moral lesson like, "don't steal." I'd recommend this book to anyone who enjoys classic tales, whimsical short stories, melancholy circumstances, or wants to quickly become a well read individual.

  23. 4 out of 5

    erl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 805 pages of dreary, depressing, redundant tales. Social mobility is a sin, Christianity is the only option for all decent people, and even so, at least one character dies in each story, usually the protagonist. Indeed, often people die for no reason at all except, apparently, to end the story on an awful note. The book is interesting because one can read the original versions of The Little Mermaid or The Snow Queen without the pasty Disney alterations, and the illustrations are nice. But seriou 805 pages of dreary, depressing, redundant tales. Social mobility is a sin, Christianity is the only option for all decent people, and even so, at least one character dies in each story, usually the protagonist. Indeed, often people die for no reason at all except, apparently, to end the story on an awful note. The book is interesting because one can read the original versions of The Little Mermaid or The Snow Queen without the pasty Disney alterations, and the illustrations are nice. But seriously, HCA could have made his point in less than 100 pages: Life Sucks and then You Die.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bianca Klein Haneveld

    These fairy tales would probably have enchanted me more if I would not have crammed them in 2 days of reading. Individually they are full of imagination, wit and beauty. Taken as a whole there are some repetitive themes and the moral of the stories (don't be vain!) becomes a bit overbearing. A 'must read' though. These fairy tales would probably have enchanted me more if I would not have crammed them in 2 days of reading. Individually they are full of imagination, wit and beauty. Taken as a whole there are some repetitive themes and the moral of the stories (don't be vain!) becomes a bit overbearing. A 'must read' though.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gofita

    Read a lot of new stories. Finally read The Little Match Girl....OMG! Tear-jerker. It was fun reading aloud with my son. He was quite a storyteller.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    Our December book club book was A Christmas Greeting: Fourteen Magical Christmas Stories by Hans Christian Andersen (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31103/...) "The Old House” "The Drop of Water" "The Happy Family" "The Story of a Mother" "The False Collar" "The Shadow" "The Old Street-Lamp" "The Dream of Little Tuk" "The Naughty Boy" "The Two Neighboring Families" "The Darning Needle" "The Little Match Girl" "The Red Shoes” We were excited to read fairy tales about Christmas… but the book was give Our December book club book was A Christmas Greeting: Fourteen Magical Christmas Stories by Hans Christian Andersen (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31103/...) "The Old House” "The Drop of Water" "The Happy Family" "The Story of a Mother" "The False Collar" "The Shadow" "The Old Street-Lamp" "The Dream of Little Tuk" "The Naughty Boy" "The Two Neighboring Families" "The Darning Needle" "The Little Match Girl" "The Red Shoes” We were excited to read fairy tales about Christmas… but the book was given by Mr. Andersen as a Christmas gift to his friends. It was NOT a collection of “Christmas-themed stories”. Because only one story of the 14 is (almost) a Christmas story (“The Little Match Girl”), we also read these 3 classic fairy tales: The Brave Tin Soldier The Fir Tree The Snow Queen “The Red Shoes” and “Story of a Mother” were definitely NOT childrens’ stories. I loved reading Andersen’s moral lessons (“don’t be boastful” was a common theme) and though I did not read this whole 800-page unabridged collection of fairy tales, I read and enjoyed the 16 above plus: The Ugly Duckling The Little Mermaid The Princess and the Pea The Emperor’s New Suit This Fable is Intended for You Quotes I liked: “I am very happy to think that we have our good house, and the little one has his also! There is more done for us than for all other creatures, sure enough; but can you not see that we are folks of quality in the world? We are provided with a house from our birth, and the burdock forest is planted for our sakes! I should like to know how far it extends, and what there is outside!" "There is nothing at all," said Father Snail. "No place can be better than ours, and I have nothing to wish for!" "Yes," said the dame. "I would willingly go to the manor-house, be boiled, and laid on a silver dish; all our forefathers have been treated so; there is something extraordinary in it, you may be sure!" -“The Happy Family” “Nay, how lonely the old man is!—do you think that he gets kisses? do you think he gets mild eyes, or a Christmas tree?—He will get nothing but a grave.—I can bear it no longer!" "You must not let it grieve you so much," said the little boy; "I find it so very delightful here, and then all the old thoughts, with what they may bring with them, they come and visit here." -“The Old House” "I am too delicate for this world!" said the needle, as it lay in the sink, "but I know who I am, and that is always a consolation;" and the darning-needle maintained its proud demeanor, and lost none of its good-humor. And all sorts of things swam over it—shavings, straws, and scraps of old newspapers. "Only look how they sail by," said the needle. "They do not know what is hidden below them! I stick fast here: here I sit. Look! there goes a shaving: it thinks of nothing in the world but of itself—but of a shaving! There drifts a straw; and how it tacks about, how it turns round! Think of something else besides yourself, or else perhaps you'll run against a stone! There swims a bit of a newspaper. What's written there is long ago forgotten, and yet out it spreads itself, as if it were mighty important! I sit here patient and still: I know who I am, and that I shall remain after all!" –“The Darning Needle” “And herein lies the truest pleasure, for joy which we cannot share with others is only half enjoyed.” –The Old Street Lamp “And this is a warning to us, to be careful how we act, for we may some day find ourselves in the rag-bag, to be turned into white paper, on which our whole history may be written, even its most secret actions. And it would not be pleasant to have to run about the world in the form of a piece of paper, telling everything we have done, like the boasting shirt collar.” –The Shirt Collar Looking in a microscope: “It looked really like a great town reflected there, in which all the people were running about without clothes. It was terrible! But it was still more terrible to see how one beat and pushed the other, and bit and hacked, and tugged and mauled him. Those at the top were being pulled down, and those at the bottom were struggling upwards… ‘That’s Paris, or some other great city, for they’re all alike. It’s a great city!’ ‘It’s a drop of puddle water!’ said Kribble-Krabble.” –“The Drop of Water” And if anyone else is searching for Hans Christian Andersen stories about Christmas, here are the ones I found by skimming through this book: The Fir Tree The Snow Queen The Last Dream of the Old Oak Under the Willow-Tree The Mail-Coach Passengers The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf The Cripple The Thistle’s Experiences

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patrice

    The Tallow Candle :/ The Tinderbox :/ Little Claus and Big Claus :) The Princess on the Pea :/ Little Ida's Flowers :/ Thumbelina :) The Naughty Boy :/ The Traveling Companion :) God Can Never Die :/ The Talisman :) This Fable is Intended For You :/ The Little Mermaid :) The Emperor's New Clothes :) The Galoshes of Fortune :) The Daisy :/ The Steadfast Tin Soldier :/ The Wild Swans :) The Garden of Paradise :) The Flying Trunk :) The Storms :/ The Rose Elf :( What the Moon Saw :( The Wicked Prince :/ The Buckwheat :/ O The Tallow Candle :/ The Tinderbox :/ Little Claus and Big Claus :) The Princess on the Pea :/ Little Ida's Flowers :/ Thumbelina :) The Naughty Boy :/ The Traveling Companion :) God Can Never Die :/ The Talisman :) This Fable is Intended For You :/ The Little Mermaid :) The Emperor's New Clothes :) The Galoshes of Fortune :) The Daisy :/ The Steadfast Tin Soldier :/ The Wild Swans :) The Garden of Paradise :) The Flying Trunk :) The Storms :/ The Rose Elf :( What the Moon Saw :( The Wicked Prince :/ The Buckwheat :/ Ole Lukoie :( The Swineherd :/ The Metal Pig :( The Bond of Friendship :/ A Rose from Homer's Grave :( The Angel :/ The Nightingale :) The Ugly Duckling :) The Sweethearts :/ The Fir Tree :( The Snow Queen :) The Elder-Tree Mother :( The Elf Mound :/ The Red Shoes :/ The Jumpers :/ The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep :/ Holger Danske :( The Bell :( Grandmother :/ The Darning Needle :/ The Little Match Girl :/ A Picture from the Ramparts :/ A View from Vartou's Window :/ The Old Streetlamp :( The Neighboring Families :( Little Tuck :/ The Shadow :) The Old House :) The Drop of Water :/ The Happy Family :/ The Story of a Mother :) The Shirt Collar :/ The Flax :/ The Phoenix Bird :( A Story :/ The Puppet-show Man :) The Silent Book :( There is a Difference :/ The World's Fairest Rose :/ The Pigs :( The Old Tombstone :/ The Swan's Nest :( The Story of the Year :) It's Quite True! :) A Good Humor :/ On Judgement Day :/ Heartache :( Everything in it's Proper Place :) The Goblin and the Grocer :/ Under the Willow Tree :( Five Peas from a Pod :) She was Good for Nothing :) Thousands of Years from Now :/ The Last Pearl :/ Two Maidens :( A Leaf from Heaven :/ At the Uttermost Parts of the Sea :( The Money Pig :/ Clumsy Hans :) Ib and Little Christine :/ The Thorny Road of Honor :( The Jewish Girl :( A String of Pearls :/ The Bell Deep :/ The Bottleneck :) Soup from a Sausage Peg :) The Nightcap of the "Pebersvend" :( Something :) The Old Oak Tree's Last Dream :/ The Marsh King 's Daughter :) The Racers :( The Stone of the Wise Man :/ The A-B-C Book :( The Wind Tells about Valdemar Daae and his Daughters :( The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf :/ Ole, the Tower Keeper :( Anne Lisbeth :/ Children's Prattle :/ The Child in the Grave :( Two Brothers :/ Pen and Inkstand :/ The Farmyard Cock and the Weathercock :( Beautiful :) A Story from the Sand Dunes :/ Moving Day :) The Butterfly :/ The Bishop of Borglum and his Men :/ Twelve by the Mail :) The Beetle :/ What the Old Man Does is Always Right :) The Snow Man :/ In the Duck Yard :( The Ice Maiden ) The Psyche :) The Snail and the Rosebush :( The Old Church Bell :( The Silver Shilling :/ The New Century's Goddess :( The Snowdrop :( The Teapot :( The Bird of Folklore :( The Will-o-the-Wisps are in Town :/ The Windmill :/ In the Children's Room :/ Golden Treasure :/ The Storm Shifts the Signboards :) Kept Secret but Not Forgotten :/ The Potter's Son :) Aunty :) The Toad :/ The Little Green Ones :( Vano and Glano :( The Goblin and the Woman :) The Dryad :) Godfather's Picture Book :/ The Rags :) Which was the Happiest? :/ The Days of the Week :/ Pieter, Peter and Peer :( The Court Cards :/ Luck May Lie in a Pin :( Sunshine Stories :/ What One Can Invent :) What Happened to the Thistle :) Chicken Grethe's Family :) The Comet :/ The Candles :) The Most Incredible Thing :) Danish Popular Legends :) Lucky Peer :/ What the Whole Family Said :( Great-grandfather :/ The Great Sea Serpent :/ Dance, Dance, Doll of Mine :/ The Gardener and the Noble Family :) The Cripple :) The Gate Key :/ Aunty Toothache :) What Old Johanne Told :( The Flea and the Professor :( Croak! :( The Penman :( Folks Say___ :( The Poor Woman and the Little Canary Bird :/ Urbanus :/

  28. 4 out of 5

    Atiqah Ghazali

    The Complete Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen Published by Wordsworth Edition Ltd Goodread's Rating: 4.28/5 My Rating: 4.56/5 "... now it worked much more evil than before; for some of these pieces were hardly so large as a grain of sand, and they flew about in the wide world, and when they got into people’s eyes, there they stayed; and then people saw everything perverted, or only had an eye for that which was evil. This happened because the very smallest bit had the same power which the whol The Complete Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen Published by Wordsworth Edition Ltd Goodread's Rating: 4.28/5 My Rating: 4.56/5 "... now it worked much more evil than before; for some of these pieces were hardly so large as a grain of sand, and they flew about in the wide world, and when they got into people’s eyes, there they stayed; and then people saw everything perverted, or only had an eye for that which was evil. This happened because the very smallest bit had the same power which the whole mirror had possessed. Some persons even got a splinter in their hearts, and then it made one shudder, for their hearts became like a lump of ice." The Snow Queen. Took me 25 days to finish reading 1,258 pages of 127 stories. These 12 days of restricted movement order here in Malaysia aided me in my reading. Not many know that some of Disney's princesses stories were either adapted from Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tales or by Brother Grimms. From more than hundred stories, some tales are more familiar yet every stories are melancholy and poetic. There are something in his writings that easily transported me into another world, another fantasy amidst this soul strangling epidemic happening now. The most famous ones are The Little Mermaid, Little Tiny or Thumbelina, The Ugly Duckling, The Emperor's New Suit, The Princess and the Pea, The Nightingale, The Red Shoes, The Brave Tin Soldier, The Snow Queen and The Wild Swans. This national treasure of Denmark has written some of these tales as his own autobiography. He was the ugly duckling that was ostracized when he was a boy because of his physical, and he grew into a wild swan which he depicted as cultured, educated, elegant people. Some other tales were dramatization of his own dilemmas. Most of these fairy tales have been translated and reproduced to more than 100 languages, even in Bahasa Melayu. However, with translation, some stories were obliterated and has skewed or altered the author's image abroad. This is the core reason and also a responsibility for readers to ensure the translation version that they chose to read is written by prolific translators too. "Then your tail will divide and shrink until it becomes what the people on earth call a pair of shapely legs. But it will hurt; it will feel as if a sharp sword slashed through you. Everyone who sees you will say that you are the most graceful human being they have ever laid eyes on, for you will keep your gliding movement and no dancer will be able to tread as lightly as you. But every step you take will feel as if you were treading upon knife blades so sharp that blood must flow. I am willing to help you, but are you willing to suffer all this?" The Little Mermaid.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    When it comes to fairy tales, there are three big names that come to mind - the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, and Andrew Lang. Depending on what you are looking for and the age range of your child, you could read any or all of these and have enough tales to last you for days. Today, I will be reviewing the Canterbury Classics version of Hans Christian Andersen's Complete Fairy Tales. The book is a pretty edition in that it is hardcover, leather, gold-edged pages, and comes with a ribb When it comes to fairy tales, there are three big names that come to mind - the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, and Andrew Lang. Depending on what you are looking for and the age range of your child, you could read any or all of these and have enough tales to last you for days. Today, I will be reviewing the Canterbury Classics version of Hans Christian Andersen's Complete Fairy Tales. The book is a pretty edition in that it is hardcover, leather, gold-edged pages, and comes with a ribbon bookmark. The pages are a little thinner than I expected, so there is a little bleed through of text when reading. Also, there are sadly no illustrations, literally zero. This gives me the feel that the book is more geared toward teens or adults, and not younger children. What leads more to the idea that this book is geared for an older audience is the introduction. In addition to basic information about his life, there are comparisons between the tales of the Brothers Grimm and those of Andersen. "Andersen's stories were also much more Christian in orientation that Grimms'." The introduction goes on to state that "Andersen also uses religion to give his most tragic stories a "happy ending." After these brief introduction, we dive into the fairy tales. The fairy tales themselves are arranged chronologically and start with a recently discovered one entitled "The Tallow Candle." This one was written sometime in the 1820s with the others being written from the mid 1830s to the early 1870s. Within these tales, there are a lot of stories I don't recognize but also a bunch of my favorites like "The Emperor's New Clothes" and "The Ugly Duckling." There are also a bit depressing versions of stories you thought you new, like "The Little Mermaid." Way different than Disney spun it to be! Overall, this is an impressive volume that's only negative is that it is lacking in illustrations. Aside from that, it is a worthy edition to the Canterbury Classics line of books. If you are looking for classics in an attractive format that will look good on your shelf and will hold the test of time, this is a great selection of books that include other tomes like Bulfinch's Mythology and The Arabian Nights.

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Lucy

    If you don't know Andersen, you don't know much. He's the author of so many of our favorite fairy tales and stories that for that reason alone you should read him. Of course, he himself says that he doesn't understand why most people only read his earlier work and think that his later work is inferior: Princess and the Pea, Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling, etc., were all written fairly early in his career. But as you read his tales you should see that his later work is just as brilliant. Indee If you don't know Andersen, you don't know much. He's the author of so many of our favorite fairy tales and stories that for that reason alone you should read him. Of course, he himself says that he doesn't understand why most people only read his earlier work and think that his later work is inferior: Princess and the Pea, Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling, etc., were all written fairly early in his career. But as you read his tales you should see that his later work is just as brilliant. Indeed, his later work, from a literary standpoint, is perhaps better; certainly more mature, less fantastical in general, and in general less "happy," but brilliant and quite entertaining all the same. Remember that all Andersen's stories are written for children. That doesn't mean that adults cannot find the stories entertaining or meaningful, simply that they were written for children. I emphasize this fact because nowadays many of these stories would be hidden away from kids so that they wouldn't be upset by the hard nature of life. But, in a way, that's Andersen's point: let's use our imagination and see in the world what is not readily apparent, but life is often harsh nonetheless; indeed, our imagination, generosity, and broad perspective may be our only recourse to sanity when we grow up. These stories are fun and full of good, solid lessons for kids, and for all of us. I do not recommend doing what I did, just reading through the collection and sometimes reading multiple stories in one day. Read one tale a day for a year and then go back and read your favorites one a day, and you'll end your year in higher spirits and with a better outlook on life.

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