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The Mystery of the Green Ghost

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A green ghost oozes through the walls of a crumbling old mansion, leading The Three Investigators to an open coffin and a grinning skeleton wearing a string of priceless Chinese Ghost Pearls. When the ghost disappears--along with the pearls--the sleuths are off on their strangest case ever!


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A green ghost oozes through the walls of a crumbling old mansion, leading The Three Investigators to an open coffin and a grinning skeleton wearing a string of priceless Chinese Ghost Pearls. When the ghost disappears--along with the pearls--the sleuths are off on their strangest case ever!

30 review for The Mystery of the Green Ghost

  1. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    This book is one of my most favourites in the "Three Investigators" series. I love mystery stories in which not everything is rationally explained (meaning: there's only a paranormal "explanation" after all, or "The monster lived after all!") at the end, and this one does have that element. So it gets a 5 star rating because I personally love it, not because it's a literary masterpiece or extremely complicated or highly recommended by me or anything. But 5 stars it is, it has a special place in This book is one of my most favourites in the "Three Investigators" series. I love mystery stories in which not everything is rationally explained (meaning: there's only a paranormal "explanation" after all, or "The monster lived after all!") at the end, and this one does have that element. So it gets a 5 star rating because I personally love it, not because it's a literary masterpiece or extremely complicated or highly recommended by me or anything. But 5 stars it is, it has a special place in my heart. More books in the series will get this rating for this same reason.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    Another good three investigators mystery, but they honestly are all ready getting a bit predictable. Although I suppose in a young adult mystery series, you will end up with several "Scooby Doo" type stories. We have a haunted house, a spooky ancient chinese guy, some valuable Ghost Pearls, and a huge mystery for the boys to solve. Even when predictable, these books always entertain. I suppose some of them is the power of nostalgia, but the books are also pretty well written. Another good three investigators mystery, but they honestly are all ready getting a bit predictable. Although I suppose in a young adult mystery series, you will end up with several "Scooby Doo" type stories. We have a haunted house, a spooky ancient chinese guy, some valuable Ghost Pearls, and a huge mystery for the boys to solve. Even when predictable, these books always entertain. I suppose some of them is the power of nostalgia, but the books are also pretty well written.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris

    Jupiter Jones,Pete Crenshaw,Bob Andrews what an awesome childhood we had!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    This was a fun read and very entertaining, even fifty years after it was written. Definitely not Pulitzer Prize-winning material, but then it isn’t intended to be. I debated whether to review this as I review most books – meaning, my thoughts and point of view right now, just having finished reading the book – or to look at it as my 12 or 13 year-old self might have done. To me, book reviews are best when I get my current thoughts and impressions down, so that’s what I’m going with and why this This was a fun read and very entertaining, even fifty years after it was written. Definitely not Pulitzer Prize-winning material, but then it isn’t intended to be. I debated whether to review this as I review most books – meaning, my thoughts and point of view right now, just having finished reading the book – or to look at it as my 12 or 13 year-old self might have done. To me, book reviews are best when I get my current thoughts and impressions down, so that’s what I’m going with and why this gets 4 stars. If I had read this when I was 12 or 13 (as I did read some of the other Three Investigators books at that time) I probably would’ve given it a resounding 5 stars. The adventure, the exploration, and the settings were totally top-notch. Great stuff there, all around, and this is the kind of stuff a preteen or teen kid would focus on (or, at least, I did when I was that age). Cool, slightly creepy “off limits” type places to explore are to be found on almost every page of this book, starting off with a bang in front of an abandoned, sprawling old mansion, and goes from one cool place to the next. Although it was given very little “screen time” (or, more appropriately, page time), the hideout/headquarters of the Three Investigators – a forgotten mobile home in a forgotten corner of a junkyard, hidden beneath piles of scrap, with an office, a laboratory, and a darkroom inside – wow. Totally the type of thing my 11, 12, 13 year-old self would have been over the moon about, and a thrill to read. And the rest of the settings were equally as awesome: (view spoiler)[A secret room hidden in the decaying mansion! A sprawling vineyard and winery! Eerie, creepy caves running through the mountains and connection various places, with lots of secrets and danger inside!!! Be still my ghost-of-a-preteen heart. Then a hidden, secret room in an undisclosed location in Chinatown in San Francisco complete with a 107 year-old Chinese tycoon. (hide spoiler)] It is all completely the type of stuff that makes the best adventure stories and movies, and the stuff I used to fantasize about as a kid. Loved it. The characters were decent, too. The focus in this book is on the excitement, the adventure, the exploration, which is exactly where it should be in a book for preteen readers. Characterization and plot pacing probably aren’t first and foremost on their minds, though they do sit pretty high on my list. And in regard to the characters, they were OK. As this is a series, reading multiple books would, I’m sure, provide more insight and depth into the three main characters: Jupiter, Pete, and Bob. They avoid being too flat and stereotypical (something that tends to befall a lot of protagonists in young adult fiction, especially from that time period)...Jupiter is smart, but instead of being the nerdy type, he’s more of the bumbling “stocky” type (think of Chunk from The Goonies, only having Data’s mind and personality…and interesting mix of character and archetype); Pete is the tall, athletic, good-looking jock type, but with a touch more brains and more sympathy and empathy than usually present in such a character; and Bob is more of the nerd (and I say that lovingly, as I like nerds), the smaller kid who isn’t quite as fast as strong, but who is very persistent and always ready and willing…his smarts are in more of a persistent, hard work type of way than the confident (sometimes overconfident) smarts of Jupiter that just come easily to him. I’m sure that Jupiter and Bob would both get straight As in school…but Bob’s straight As would come from diligent studying, whereas Jupiter would just stride into the room to take a test without having studied a minute. The secondary characters are for the most part interesting, as well. Chang Green being the most prominent of the secondary characters, of course; a boy the same age as our Three Investigators, one-quarter Chinese and three-quarters American, but having been raised nearly his entire life in China. That brings some interesting background and allows him for a much richer backstory than a secondary character might normally have had. Chang is a nice guy, who forms easy, fast friendships with Bob and Pete, and isn’t at all a “fourth” wheel; he blends seamlessly with the group and is a welcome asset. And the others, such as Miss Lydia Green, are also given a fair amount of backstory and personality, a bit more than in some other contemporary books/series. The background characters (assorted policemen, servants, employees, hangers-on, etc) are pretty flat and one-dimensional, but since they all have bit parts and appear only on one or two pages, that isn’t really surprising. Overall the presentation reminded me very much of a Scooby Doo episode (and I say that fondly) …although the “thought pictures” in my mind were live action, it still felt a bit like a mystery cartoon from the 1960s or ‘70s, and I could almost hear the creepy orchestral music with strings and oboes and horns and all that. Pretty neat. The pacing of the story and the logic behind the plot is what I found most lacking of all (again, it wouldn’t be an emphasis for a preteen reader, perhaps, but it is for me.) The author’s great ideas for the settings, events, adventure, exploration, and dangerous predicaments were written well, but trying to string them all together into a plausible and logical sequence of events…well, that left a bit to be desired. I didn’t really feel like the story flowed smoothly all the way; it was more like jumping from one exciting event to the next, even when the prior event hadn’t really finished. A well-paced story (in my humble opinion) intersperses moments of excitement and intensity with short periods of dénouement or reflection or just contemplative “down time.” While this story had both of those elements, sometimes it felt like they were just rammed up against each other like a bunch of toy building blocks to string them up in an order but without much finesse in making the whole thing seamless. Having cool story elements is half the battle – but you also need to stitch them together in a way that makes sense. However the mystery aspect of the writing was quite well done. I loved how clues were dangled in front of the reader’s eyes at various points (though not necessarily all of the meaning of the clue), enough to make your ears perk up – sometimes you really had to be paying attention, as it was more what wasn’t said, than what was (and I’m not just referring to the dog, here, but to several other things/events). (view spoiler)[Again going back to Scooby Doo, there was the standard info-dump of “how it was all done” at the end of the book, with the mystery villains unmasked, which was common for that time period. Kind of dated, today, but I guess there is a certain satisfaction in learning how it was all done. (hide spoiler)] I was a little amused and bemused by the whole Alfred Hitchcock connection thing. I know the anonymous editor also worked in some capacity on the Hitchcock TV shows, and that Alfred Hitchcock apparently blessed his name being used with this book series, but he really didn’t have anything to do with the story or with the editing. The whole “introduction” by the editor sounded more like something you’d see on a TV show of that time period – why is it necessary to introduce characters in a book, when the introduction of characters is always part of the story itself? And the “summary/paraphrase” scene at the end, where the boys supposedly sat with the writer/editor and told him their story, was just a little gimmicky to me. Not really needed, in my opinion. Overall, I had a blast reading this book, and I’m going to go back to my local used bookstore (who has several of the Three Investigators books for sale) and get some more of them. Really fun to read, and although written a half-century ago, they are just as exciting and entertaining now as they must have been back then.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    I read a few of the "Three Investigators" books when I was a kid and remembered them fondly. A few years back I found a bunch of them at a book sale and picked them up. This is one of those and I really enjoyed revisiting my childhood. In this one, an old house is being torn down when a mysterious green ghost appears. Two of the investigators, Bob Andrews and Pete Crenshaw are on hand for that first appearance. Later, the third member of the trio, brainy Jupiter Jones, joins in. The boys solve t I read a few of the "Three Investigators" books when I was a kid and remembered them fondly. A few years back I found a bunch of them at a book sale and picked them up. This is one of those and I really enjoyed revisiting my childhood. In this one, an old house is being torn down when a mysterious green ghost appears. Two of the investigators, Bob Andrews and Pete Crenshaw are on hand for that first appearance. Later, the third member of the trio, brainy Jupiter Jones, joins in. The boys solve the case, of course, after some adventures and close calls. I won't give the plot away here. I liked it. An easy, fun read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    What a great young adult story....written in 1965. The Mystery of the Green Ghost had a strong plot, excellent characters, and overall was an engaging story. Loved this story when I was 12 and love it now forty years later.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James Joyce

    This series (and this book in particular) was one of those I remember ordering from Scholastic Book Club, when I was a kid. I remember getting the box of books, a couple times a year, like a little Christmas at school. I re-read this for nostalgia's sake, The Three Investigators being among my most remembered youth reads. I dreamed of being a member of this group. Their clubhouse is an abandoned motorhome hidden in the back of the junkyard that Jupiter Jones's (the boy genius) family owns. And th This series (and this book in particular) was one of those I remember ordering from Scholastic Book Club, when I was a kid. I remember getting the box of books, a couple times a year, like a little Christmas at school. I re-read this for nostalgia's sake, The Three Investigators being among my most remembered youth reads. I dreamed of being a member of this group. Their clubhouse is an abandoned motorhome hidden in the back of the junkyard that Jupiter Jones's (the boy genius) family owns. And there are secret tunnels, covered by junk, that the boys use to get to it. It even has its own telephone line. Not to mention the periscope they rigged, to see what's happening beyond their hiding space. Ahhh... the stuff of legends, for a young boy. [image error] Like in most of their investigations (that I can recall) they have an apparent supernatural mystery that they put their minds to and expose as a hoax, covering up a crime. Basically, Scooby-Doo ripped them off. They would have got away with it, if not for Jupiter Jones, Pete Crenshaw, and Bob Andrews. (as an additional amusement for fans of this series who may be interested in an ironic take on the concept, check out the Donald Glover film "Dream Team", which is basically what happens if the Three Investigators grow up, without changing a bit. Incredibly funny.) And I'm not kidding about Scooby-Doo. The concept for that series was ripped from the pages of The Three Investigators.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Quinton Baran

    I remember liking this book quite a bit when I was a boy. It is still good, but not as good as I remember it. I associate it quite a bit with the early Scooby Doo cartoons - the ones with actual ghosts or phantoms (people in sheets) were may favorites, so I think that is why this book was also a favorite. Re-reading it to my kids, I found it not quite as engaging as Terror Castle or the Stuttering Parrot. Lots of interesting characters though, with a couple neat locations and an engaging mystery I remember liking this book quite a bit when I was a boy. It is still good, but not as good as I remember it. I associate it quite a bit with the early Scooby Doo cartoons - the ones with actual ghosts or phantoms (people in sheets) were may favorites, so I think that is why this book was also a favorite. Re-reading it to my kids, I found it not quite as engaging as Terror Castle or the Stuttering Parrot. Lots of interesting characters though, with a couple neat locations and an engaging mystery as well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    The Batman (Reagan)

    Charming in its antiquity and fairly appropriate to the Halloween season. It's like a novelized Scooby Doo episode. "Gleeps!" should have been Fred's catchphrase. Charming in its antiquity and fairly appropriate to the Halloween season. It's like a novelized Scooby Doo episode. "Gleeps!" should have been Fred's catchphrase.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    2008 review - Starting with one of the better opening sequences of the series, this mystery maintains its initial pace and interest well. Splitting the team in a well-written fashion, all of the characters are given a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax. Well told and well put together, this is another sterling Robert Arthur effort (and nicely follows the timeline, with Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins). 2014 update - Bob Andrews and Pete Cren 2008 review - Starting with one of the better opening sequences of the series, this mystery maintains its initial pace and interest well. Splitting the team in a well-written fashion, all of the characters are given a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax. Well told and well put together, this is another sterling Robert Arthur effort (and nicely follows the timeline, with Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins). 2014 update - Bob Andrews and Pete Crenshaw decide to investigate Green House, an old mansion in Rocky Beach that is being torn down. Hearing a ghastly scream, they bump into a group of men from the neighbourhood, who are also there to look at the house. Together, they investigate and see a green ghost moving through the old, dusty hallways. After they leave, the ghost is spotted around Rocky Beach by several eye-witnesses, one of whom happens to be Chief of Police Reynolds. When the house is investigated by the police the next day, with the Three Investigators and Bob’s father in tow, a hidden room is discovered, which contains a skeleton - the remains of Matthias Green’s wife - and a string of ghost pearls. Bob & Pete are then invited to the Verdant Valley winery, near San Francisco, which is run by Matthias Green’s only living relative where, very soon, they encounter a mysterious aged Chinaman called Mr Won, people who aren’t who they appear to be, scary caves and the re-appearance of the green ghost. This has one of the better opening sequences of the series and manages to maintain the pace and intrigue well, with a good supporting cast and excellent use of location (the ‘haunted house’, the desolate canyons, Chinatown). Splitting the team is a masterstroke, giving each character a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax and the interplay between the three lads is well handled. Well told and constructed, this is one of the better Arthur novels and follows the timeline nicely (it mentions Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins and this is the book where the Investigators get their ‘Volunteer Junior Assistant Deputy’ cards from Chief Reynolds). My only niggle is the final chapter, which can’t seem to decide if it’s part of the story or just a simple catch-up of action, though it does end on a high in Hitchcock’s office. Good fun, with a cracking pace, this is highly recommended. 2018 update - completely agree with the above, an excellent read and it’s worth mentioning that this is the story to introduce Chief Reynolds to the series. A cracking story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    2008 review - Starting with one of the better opening sequences of the series, this mystery maintains its initial pace and interest well. Splitting the team in a well-written fashion, all of the characters are given a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax. Well told and well put together, this is another sterling Robert Arthur effort (and nicely follows the timeline, with Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins). 2014 update - Bob Andrews and Pete Cren 2008 review - Starting with one of the better opening sequences of the series, this mystery maintains its initial pace and interest well. Splitting the team in a well-written fashion, all of the characters are given a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax. Well told and well put together, this is another sterling Robert Arthur effort (and nicely follows the timeline, with Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins). 2014 update - Bob Andrews and Pete Crenshaw decide to investigate Green House, an old mansion in Rocky Beach that is being torn down. Hearing a ghastly scream, they bump into a group of men from the neighbourhood, who are also there to look at the house. Together, they investigate and see a green ghost moving through the old, dusty hallways. After they leave, the ghost is spotted around Rocky Beach by several eye-witnesses, one of whom happens to be Chief of Police Reynolds. When the house is investigated by the police the next day, with the Three Investigators and Bob’s father in tow, a hidden room is discovered, which contains a skeleton - the remains of Matthias Green’s wife - and a string of ghost pearls. Bob & Pete are then invited to the Verdant Valley winery, near San Francisco, which is run by Matthias Green’s only living relative where, very soon, they encounter a mysterious aged Chinaman called Mr Won, people who aren’t who they appear to be, scary caves and the re-appearance of the green ghost. This has one of the better opening sequences on the series and manages to maintain the pace and intrigue well, with a good supporting cast and excellent use of location (the ‘haunted house’, the desolate canyons, Chinatown). Splitting the team is a masterstroke, giving each character a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax and the interplay between the three lads is well handled. Well told and constructed, this is one of the better Arthur novels and follows the timeline nicely (it mentions Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins and this is the book where the Investigators get their ‘Volunteer Junior Assistant Deputy’ cards from Chief Reynolds). My only niggle is the final chapter, which can’t seem to decide if it’s part of the story or just a simple catch-up of action, though it does end on a high in Hitchcock’s office. Good fun, with a cracking pace, this is highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Cox

    I loved these books when I was a kid. I was never into Nancy Drew or the The Hardy Boys. The Three Investigators series was it for me. I still like them as much now as I did then. I wish I owned the whole series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Findley

    I read the original version (with Hitchcock in the final chapter) probably 40 years ago. This reissue from 1985 replace Hitchcock with Hector Sebastian, but little else was changed that I could see. The actual mystery is quite good, and even a jaded mystery lover should have a surprise or two before the end. The ghost is explained without any suspension of belief needed, and the danger the boys are placed is clearly explained so even young readers understand. In fact, one or two lines should hav I read the original version (with Hitchcock in the final chapter) probably 40 years ago. This reissue from 1985 replace Hitchcock with Hector Sebastian, but little else was changed that I could see. The actual mystery is quite good, and even a jaded mystery lover should have a surprise or two before the end. The ghost is explained without any suspension of belief needed, and the danger the boys are placed is clearly explained so even young readers understand. In fact, one or two lines should have parents really think about letting a child under ten read it. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this with my youngest child, and recommend it to other parents. Find it! Buy it! Read it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    This one might have been part of the two-and-a-half investigators. It was nice, as the books often seem to he centered around Jupiter Jones to see the other two getting to take a more prominent role in the story. The mystery itself didn’t go anywhere necessarily unforeseen but the setup was executed well enough and it kept me entertained throughout.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maria Karousi

    A nice, entertaining, story. It took same pages to get to the point thought. Nevertheless, after the second half of the book it started getting more interesting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    The Mystery of the Green Ghost There's a series of books called The Three Investigators by Robert Arthur. The book in the series I read was The Mystery of the Green Ghost. This story is about what the title indicates -- three investigators solving a mystery in Rocky Beach, California, around 1964, where they travel through a mansion and in tunnels under the city. Instead of calling them the three investigators, let’s call them by their real names: Bob Andrews, Peter Crenshaw, and Jupiter Jones. The Mystery of the Green Ghost There's a series of books called The Three Investigators by Robert Arthur. The book in the series I read was The Mystery of the Green Ghost. This story is about what the title indicates -- three investigators solving a mystery in Rocky Beach, California, around 1964, where they travel through a mansion and in tunnels under the city. Instead of calling them the three investigators, let’s call them by their real names: Bob Andrews, Peter Crenshaw, and Jupiter Jones. They first come into the story going into a haunted house, not knowing what they would encounter in there. As they kept going through the house, they would hear strange noises, and they thought running for the lives was the best idea. As something was chasing them, they made it outside, where they encountered an old man leading a group, almost knocking them down. “The old man asked, good heavens you almost knocked me down what's the hurry”.(6) “The boys responded to hearing and seeing some ghost activity.”(6) As Peter and Bob were so scared the old man and the group said “ let us go see what ‘s the problem you guys just go home and make sure to take care.(11) While the was going into the house the Peter said“ we need to solve this mystery and find out what’s going on”. (7) As the story progressed on the boys kept finding out more and more clues. So they went into the house and saw this figure or the ghost. “ They went into an empty room and were glad that it was only a coffin, but the thing that surprised them was seeing a skeleton.”(30) The plot revolves around finding the mystery of what happened to a Chinese princess and what she is hiding and doesn’t want anybody to know. The book’s big conflict is that Bob, Jupiter, and Peter are trying to keep the secret of the pearls from the public while discovering where the princess hide them. Jupiter in this story is the brainy one who found the coffin and created the plan to find the pearls. Peter is the athlete, meaning he’s there to do all the physical labor. Then we get to Bob, who is a researcher, finding out all the clues to what happened exactly to the princess. The book is a buddy book in the sense that it’s a friend book, with the three investigators all solving a mystery as friends. The mood is excitingly mysterious -- it makes you never want to put down the book. The tone of the book is that it’s not too easy to read, but not too hard -- it’s just right. The book is narrated in the sense that nobody uses personal experiences to explain the story. In my opinion it was the peak in the book, because as they followed the figure or ghost they found a crucial piece of evidence that made this story all so more exciting. The mood of the book to me was being intrigued of what was going to happen next. Now the reason why I loved this book so much is because it was my first mystery and at first I didn’t want to read it but my dad made me so I started to read it as the story got more exciting and Peter and Bob kept yelling about finding a ghost that’s what made me keep reading. I hope that’s how it’ll intrigue you to reading this great book. Arthur, Robert. The Mystery of the Green Ghost. N.p.: Random House for Young Readers, 1985. Print.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    A fun little Scooby Doo mystery, minus the goofiness, and with actual threat. This one does a much better touch on race through the lens of the time period.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Madden

    The Alfred Hitchock and the Three Investigators series of books are fondly remembered from my childhood. The Quintessentially English Famous Five were never my cup of tea, and the Secret Seven were just not adventurous enough. The Three Investigators certainly hit the spot, with adventure stories and mysteries in far off places. This one centred around a green ghost that appeared in and around various places in California, and the way Mr Arthur (the author, though for many years I actually belie The Alfred Hitchock and the Three Investigators series of books are fondly remembered from my childhood. The Quintessentially English Famous Five were never my cup of tea, and the Secret Seven were just not adventurous enough. The Three Investigators certainly hit the spot, with adventure stories and mysteries in far off places. This one centred around a green ghost that appeared in and around various places in California, and the way Mr Arthur (the author, though for many years I actually believed that Alfred Hitchcock was the author), binds the characters together is great for a young mind. He also manages continuity throughout the entire Three Investigators series, another important aspect of junior fiction as it encourages the reading of all of the books in the series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    In The Mystery of the Green Ghost, the fourth book in the series, we get to see a bit more of a focus on Pete and Bob then in previous books. Their time in the Three-V Winery is very enjoyable. The danger feels very real, Bob has several clever moments, and Pete once again keeps a clear head despite being scared. This is the first book Chief Reynolds is in. I like his character as Robert Arthur writes him, kinda grumpy but willing to listen to the boys, but later in the series some of the writers g In The Mystery of the Green Ghost, the fourth book in the series, we get to see a bit more of a focus on Pete and Bob then in previous books. Their time in the Three-V Winery is very enjoyable. The danger feels very real, Bob has several clever moments, and Pete once again keeps a clear head despite being scared. This is the first book Chief Reynolds is in. I like his character as Robert Arthur writes him, kinda grumpy but willing to listen to the boys, but later in the series some of the writers go a little extreme with his grumpiness. Jupiter is smart as always, figuring out yet another difficult case.

  20. 4 out of 5

    wanderer

    Not as good as some of The Three Investigators, but the kids liked it. I missed the junkyard Headquarters scenes, while the sleuths hung out elsewhere. Also, I didn't like that Jupiter Jones wasn't around for a lot of the book, though that did give Pete and Bob a chance to shine. The chalked question marks showed up again: always a plus. 2nd reading: just not a fan. The book reveals so much through long chunks of dialogue, when action would be so much more fun. But some of my students love these Not as good as some of The Three Investigators, but the kids liked it. I missed the junkyard Headquarters scenes, while the sleuths hung out elsewhere. Also, I didn't like that Jupiter Jones wasn't around for a lot of the book, though that did give Pete and Bob a chance to shine. The chalked question marks showed up again: always a plus. 2nd reading: just not a fan. The book reveals so much through long chunks of dialogue, when action would be so much more fun. But some of my students love these books, so...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lance

    This series is a wonderful one for kids. The Hitchcock character only does what amounts to cameos, and sometimes, if I remember correctly, doesn't even show up at all. The ones about the Mexican bandit and the Spider stand out in my mind and I remember them quite well. Overall, they were all fun to read. This series is a wonderful one for kids. The Hitchcock character only does what amounts to cameos, and sometimes, if I remember correctly, doesn't even show up at all. The ones about the Mexican bandit and the Spider stand out in my mind and I remember them quite well. Overall, they were all fun to read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    CJ

    I read Scholastic Series Mysteries as a kid in the mid- to late-70s. I found this one at a used book sale recently and loved it. Interestingly, its first owner wrote "Kim Kradle" on the inside cover. Kim, I wonder where you are? Your book is now in my home in Phoenix, Arizona. I read Scholastic Series Mysteries as a kid in the mid- to late-70s. I found this one at a used book sale recently and loved it. Interestingly, its first owner wrote "Kim Kradle" on the inside cover. Kim, I wonder where you are? Your book is now in my home in Phoenix, Arizona.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    2008 review - Starting with one of the better opening sequences of the series, this mystery maintains its initial pace and interest well. Splitting the team in a well-written fashion, all of the characters are given a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax. Well told and well put together, this is another sterling Robert Arthur effort (and nicely follows the timeline, with Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins). 2014 update - Bob Andrews and Pete Cren 2008 review - Starting with one of the better opening sequences of the series, this mystery maintains its initial pace and interest well. Splitting the team in a well-written fashion, all of the characters are given a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax. Well told and well put together, this is another sterling Robert Arthur effort (and nicely follows the timeline, with Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins). 2014 update - Bob Andrews and Pete Crenshaw decide to investigate Green House, an old mansion in Rocky Beach that is being torn down. Hearing a ghastly scream, they bump into a group of men from the neighbourhood, who are also there to look at the house. Together, they investigate and see a green ghost moving through the old, dusty hallways. After they leave, the ghost is spotted around Rocky Beach by several eye-witnesses, one of whom happens to be Chief of Police Reynolds. When the house is investigated by the police the next day, with the Three Investigators and Bob’s father in tow, a hidden room is discovered, which contains a skeleton - the remains of Matthias Green’s wife - and a string of ghost pearls. Bob & Pete are then invited to the Verdant Valley winery, near San Francisco, which is run by Matthias Green’s only living relative where, very soon, they encounter a mysterious aged Chinaman called Mr Won, people who aren’t who they appear to be, scary caves and the re-appearance of the green ghost. This has one of the better opening sequences of the series and manages to maintain the pace and intrigue well, with a good supporting cast and excellent use of location (the ‘haunted house’, the desolate canyons, Chinatown). Splitting the team is a masterstroke, giving each character a chance to shine and show their strengths, right up to the climax and the interplay between the three lads is well handled. Well told and constructed, this is one of the better Arthur novels and follows the timeline nicely (it mentions Bob having his brace removed just before the story begins and this is the book where the Investigators get their ‘Volunteer Junior Assistant Deputy’ cards from Chief Reynolds). My only niggle is the final chapter, which can’t seem to decide if it’s part of the story or just a simple catch-up of action, though it does end on a high in Hitchcock’s office. Good fun, with a cracking pace, this is highly recommended. 2018 update - completely agree with the above, an excellent read and it’s worth mentioning that this is the story to introduce Chief Reynolds to the series. A cracking story. 2021 update - hugely enjoyable re-read and it’s worth mentioning (can’t believe I haven’t before) that this points out Bob’s dad is called Bill and has a moustache! Great mystery, very well written, great fun.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Hatch

    The Mystery of the Green Ghost (1965) by Robert Arthur; illus. by Harry Kane. SUMMARY: An old house with a new ghost; a necklace of Ghost Pearls that is found and then stolen; a series of mishaps; sets the Three Investigators on a search for the truth. THE THREE INVESTIGATORS “We Investigate Anything” ? ? ? First Investigator………………Jupiter Jones Second Investigator………… Pete Crenshaw Third Investigator………………Bob Andrews (p74) “Say,” he called, “what are the question marks on your card for?” Jupiter suppre The Mystery of the Green Ghost (1965) by Robert Arthur; illus. by Harry Kane. SUMMARY: An old house with a new ghost; a necklace of Ghost Pearls that is found and then stolen; a series of mishaps; sets the Three Investigators on a search for the truth. THE THREE INVESTIGATORS “We Investigate Anything” ? ? ? First Investigator………………Jupiter Jones Second Investigator………… Pete Crenshaw Third Investigator………………Bob Andrews (p74) “Say,” he called, “what are the question marks on your card for?” Jupiter suppressed a chuckle. Those question marks always attracted attention. “The question mark,” he said, in a very adult manner, “is our symbol, our trademark. It stands for mysteries unsolved, enigmas unanswered, conundrums requiring an answer.” I grew up with The Three Investigators series and have been looking for them for years. I moved to a new town and the local library has a handful of them that I can’t wait to read. This title is the fourth in the series. The introductory chapter by Mr. Hitchcock gives an overview about the series and the Three Investigators along with details about their Headquarters. – The story actually starts real slow and it wasn’t until Chapter 10 when the boys try to escape through a cave that tunnels through the old gold mines that things picked up. From there on it is very action-packed and suspenseful. I also enjoyed the language and speech pattern of the two Chinese individuals in Chinatown – Mr. Won and Chang in chapter 12. (p124) Mr. Won looked at Chang. “Small cricket, the blood of my nation flows in your veins also. I speak of the old China, not of the China of today…. A string of priceless pearls,” he said. “For more than fifty years their whereabouts were unknown. Now they have reappeared. And I must have them.” (p125) “Oh venerable one,” [Chang] said, “we do not have the pearls. They are in the possession of another. One who is fleet of foot and stout of heart has them, and he has escaped with them to return them to my aunt. Return us to my aunt and I will try to persuade her to sell them to you….” I really liked the character of Chang, the long-lost relative that was brought over from Hong Kong to help his great aunt with the vineyard. He is very smart and cunning and was even praised as being a 4th Investigator. Not one of the better stories, but still a good read. The detailed illustrations by Harry Kane add much to the story. You do not have to read the books in the order as they were written to be able to follow the storyline. For fans of Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys (but I personally think they are better).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Demian Katz

    This is the first Three Investigators book I ever read, and I revisited it after 30+ years with some apprehension. Obviously, I loved it the first time around, which is why as an adult I'm making this (slow and sporadic) effort to re-read the whole series... but given some of the themes in this one, it had the potential to age very poorly indeed. As it happens, my concerns were somewhat justified, yet the book holds up somewhat better than I had expected. It also seems not to have stuck in my mem This is the first Three Investigators book I ever read, and I revisited it after 30+ years with some apprehension. Obviously, I loved it the first time around, which is why as an adult I'm making this (slow and sporadic) effort to re-read the whole series... but given some of the themes in this one, it had the potential to age very poorly indeed. As it happens, my concerns were somewhat justified, yet the book holds up somewhat better than I had expected. It also seems not to have stuck in my memory particularly well, because almost none of it was familiar -- I think it stuck in my memory based only on the cover and a vaguely spooky atmosphere. And of course, that spooky atmosphere is probably the greatest strength of this book; I've always most enjoyed the Three Investigators for their supernatural-flavored mysteries (even though they always have a "Scooby Doo" ending). This delivers the sort of things you might expect in a juvenile horror-mystery: a seemingly inexplicable phantom, a creepy decaying house, and even some abandoned mines. The pacing and atmosphere can't really be faulted. Also solidly on the positive side is the character of Chang, a recent immigrant from Hong Kong who helps the Investigators through much of the book. There was no guarantee at the time this book was written that he would be anything more than a comical ethnic stereotype; fortunately, he is simply presented as a smart and resourceful person who complements the series regulars effectively. Chang's positive portrayal doesn't mean the book is entirely unproblematic -- there are scattered bits of broken dialect from minor characters, and some elements of the plot evoke imagery from "yellow peril" stories common in the pulp magazines for which the author wrote before starting this series. On balance, though, within its historical context, I think this book probably did more good than harm. And, of course, there's also the mystery itself to evaluate. While the atmosphere is good, the actual plot is merely adequate. Some of the clues are dropped in rather heavy-handedly, and many aspects of the final resolution are underwhelming. It works, but it probably won't strike the reader as a particularly brilliant construction. Finally, it's interesting to see how this book advances some details of the series -- removing Bob's leg brace and establishing a closer relationship between the titular characters and the local police. I look forward to seeing if things continue to develop, though I expect that at some point the premise will become more static.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zachary جيمس фортнит

    “ ’AAAhhhhhhh---eeeeeeee!’ The ghostly scream sounded again.” In the Mystery of the Green Ghost Bob and Pete go investigate an old haunted mansion that has that has been rumored to have a ghost of the former owner to haunt who ever comes in by echoing his screams of pain from breaking his neck and dying. Nobody had the courage to go entered the area that had no life in for fifty years, but three kids who dedicated their lives to solve mysteries and crime. I find the book a little boring because, “ ’AAAhhhhhhh---eeeeeeee!’ The ghostly scream sounded again.” In the Mystery of the Green Ghost Bob and Pete go investigate an old haunted mansion that has that has been rumored to have a ghost of the former owner to haunt who ever comes in by echoing his screams of pain from breaking his neck and dying. Nobody had the courage to go entered the area that had no life in for fifty years, but three kids who dedicated their lives to solve mysteries and crime. I find the book a little boring because, it gives you something interesting and then doesn't leave it to much of a mystery. For example, one part a person game to the boy's and the officer and talked about a secret room in the mansion. Then in the next paragraph they go to the hidden room and find a... For a mystery book the author had a few mystery's worth finding out and some unworthy of solving because they are so small. for instance in one part of the book were a boy named Chang is worried about his great aunt Lydia, and it was so small because they mentioned it earlier but didn't go much into detail but phrased it a couple times. over all I recommend this book a 👏👏 3. If you like short mystery novels I will recommend this book to you. -Ζάκαρι Λόπεζ

  27. 4 out of 5

    David Phipps

    The Three Investigators is a juvenile detective series published in the 60s, 70s, and 80s that spans about 43 books. They feature three teenage boys who mostly investigate paranormal type stuff that they debunk (somewhat like Scooby-Doo) or other abnormal crimes that the police do not handle. They report their cases to Alfred Hitchcock or a fake director depending on which versions you read. Their base of operations is hidden away in the depths of a junkyard and it has multiple hidden entrances. The Three Investigators is a juvenile detective series published in the 60s, 70s, and 80s that spans about 43 books. They feature three teenage boys who mostly investigate paranormal type stuff that they debunk (somewhat like Scooby-Doo) or other abnormal crimes that the police do not handle. They report their cases to Alfred Hitchcock or a fake director depending on which versions you read. Their base of operations is hidden away in the depths of a junkyard and it has multiple hidden entrances. I discovered these books in the library during middle school and promptly read them all. As such, I have a lot of nostalgia for these books. The Mystery of the Green Ghost is #4 in the series. The boys investigate a green ghost that people keep seeing. This story involves some travel to the California wine country for the boys. It was OK but I admit that it felt a little tiresome reading this. Sometimes these books don't hold up well for me given that they are written for middle-schoolers and they can get repetitive.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zachary

    Book Recommendation Paragraph “ ’AAAhhhhhhh---eeeeeeee!’ The ghostly scream sounded again. But this time it did not bother Bob or Pete. It was coming from the tape recorder.” In the Mystery of the Green Ghost Bob and Pete go investigate an old haunted mansion that has that has been rumored to have a ghost of the former owner to haunt who ever comes in by echoing his screams of pain from breaking his neck and dying. Nobody had the courage to go entered the area that had no life in for fifty years, Book Recommendation Paragraph “ ’AAAhhhhhhh---eeeeeeee!’ The ghostly scream sounded again. But this time it did not bother Bob or Pete. It was coming from the tape recorder.” In the Mystery of the Green Ghost Bob and Pete go investigate an old haunted mansion that has that has been rumored to have a ghost of the former owner to haunt who ever comes in by echoing his screams of pain from breaking his neck and dying. Nobody had the courage to go entered the area that had no life in for fifty years, but three kids who dedicated their lives to solve mysteries and crime. I find the book a little boring because, it gives you something interesting and then doesn't leave it to much of a mystery. For example, one part a person game to the boy's and the officer and talked about a secret room in the mansion. Then in the next paragraph they go to the hidden room and find a... For a mystery book the author had a few https://www.amazon.com/Mystery-Green-...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hazel

    A ghost, a mine, and a string of pearls. Not a modern book by any means this book is a bit racist to Chinese and Mexican peoples. If you can get past that however, the story elements are quite good. I enjoy the mysticism and adventure in this book. The mystery is not terribly difficult to solve, but it is a children's book, and I have read about it before. It's interesting because the book tries to put disabilities into a more positive light (Bob's oft mentioned leg) and attempts to do a good job A ghost, a mine, and a string of pearls. Not a modern book by any means this book is a bit racist to Chinese and Mexican peoples. If you can get past that however, the story elements are quite good. I enjoy the mysticism and adventure in this book. The mystery is not terribly difficult to solve, but it is a children's book, and I have read about it before. It's interesting because the book tries to put disabilities into a more positive light (Bob's oft mentioned leg) and attempts to do a good job representing other cultures as allies. Chang Green is an honorable young fellow and helps out the investigators. It just doesn't go as far in presenting the culture in a good light as it might, but at least it does make an attempt.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cliff

    I feel that this is the weakest of the first four books. However, it's still a good bit of fun and one of the few books that I recall where the majority of the story takes place outside of their town of Rocky Beach (a stand in for Malibu?) Unfortunately, time has not been as kind to this volume as the others, primarily, in how foreigners are portrayed. Political correctness would no longer allow people to be referred to as Orientals. Although, along those lines, I'm curious whether it's appropria I feel that this is the weakest of the first four books. However, it's still a good bit of fun and one of the few books that I recall where the majority of the story takes place outside of their town of Rocky Beach (a stand in for Malibu?) Unfortunately, time has not been as kind to this volume as the others, primarily, in how foreigners are portrayed. Political correctness would no longer allow people to be referred to as Orientals. Although, along those lines, I'm curious whether it's appropriate to refer to Hans and Konrad as Bavarians.

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