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The Transformation of the School: Progressivism in American Education, 1876-1957

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Easily the best-balanced book on the twentieth-century education, an admirable history of the ideas, personalities, organizations, and pressure groups in American education. -William P. Sears, Jr. in Education


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Easily the best-balanced book on the twentieth-century education, an admirable history of the ideas, personalities, organizations, and pressure groups in American education. -William P. Sears, Jr. in Education

30 review for The Transformation of the School: Progressivism in American Education, 1876-1957

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael- Berry

    Very well written and thoroughly researched account of the progressive education movement. It concentrates on the intellectual, philosophical background that shaped the movement. The author also gives a time span of the birth to death of the movement from the turn of the 20th century to the 1950s which is surprising given that the Progressive Era was all but dead by 1919. He also does the best in my opinion of explaining John Dewey's educational philosophy and its impact on progressive education Very well written and thoroughly researched account of the progressive education movement. It concentrates on the intellectual, philosophical background that shaped the movement. The author also gives a time span of the birth to death of the movement from the turn of the 20th century to the 1950s which is surprising given that the Progressive Era was all but dead by 1919. He also does the best in my opinion of explaining John Dewey's educational philosophy and its impact on progressive education.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    A comprehensive history of progressive education from 1876-1957. Thorough and fascinating. Focuses on how progressive education developed, its definitions, influences on schools, and its seeming demise in the 1940s and 1950s.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

    The title says it all. Published in 1961, it's a 354 page history of the transformation of American schools from 1876 to 1957 (aka: the rise and collapse of progressivism in American education during that period). If you have a deep interest in education philosophy, policy, methods, etc, then you'll enjoy it. If not, you'll fall asleep by page 3. For the former group, I believe the book strikes just the right balance between a high level education philosophy discussion (Hegel, Rousseau, Dewey, Ma The title says it all. Published in 1961, it's a 354 page history of the transformation of American schools from 1876 to 1957 (aka: the rise and collapse of progressivism in American education during that period). If you have a deep interest in education philosophy, policy, methods, etc, then you'll enjoy it. If not, you'll fall asleep by page 3. For the former group, I believe the book strikes just the right balance between a high level education philosophy discussion (Hegel, Rousseau, Dewey, Mann, etc) versus specific descriptions of what "committee", chaired by who, did what, the title of its "report", and what "experimental" school was started, when, its goals and principles, and its results. If you changed the names and dates, much of the book could have been written last week and covered the period 1957-2008. Most of the concepts and much of the terminology hasn't changed. For the most part, I came away thinking, "there is nothing new under the sun".

  4. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Two words for this book: DRY and DENSE. I was actually relieved when I finally finished it. At the same time I found it quite impressive. Cremin knows literally every last detail about Progressives and the Progressive Education Movement, hence the three star rating. Don't read it unless you are really, REALLY interested in education in the United States. It is a must among the educational academic-y types. Two words for this book: DRY and DENSE. I was actually relieved when I finally finished it. At the same time I found it quite impressive. Cremin knows literally every last detail about Progressives and the Progressive Education Movement, hence the three star rating. Don't read it unless you are really, REALLY interested in education in the United States. It is a must among the educational academic-y types.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    wow. buried in early 60s academic outlook, but great overview of a fascinating bit of ed history.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terrence Crimmins

    This book is essential reading to anyone who really wants to understand the struggles, tragedies and triumphs in the history of Progressive education.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Troy Rosamond

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  9. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shanti Elliott

  11. 4 out of 5

    S.byndom

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Laurie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eric Kalenze

  15. 5 out of 5

    Urania Mylonas

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gordon

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wendy VanDellon

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Wilson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angus

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erik Hemming

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cara Rieckenberg

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  23. 4 out of 5

    Richard Brown

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Glossenger

  25. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bob DePino

  27. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Mendieta

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chantelle Grace

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gordon

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