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The Improvement of the Mind: A Supplement to Logic: With a Discourse on the Education of Children and Youth

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This is the sequel to Logic. A disciplined mind is one of the most conspicuously missing things in our society. This book can help alleviate that malady. The subtitle of this book is, "Communication of useful knowledge in religion, in the sciences, and in common life." This is a lithograph of an 1833 edition printed in London which also contains "A Discourse on the Educati This is the sequel to Logic. A disciplined mind is one of the most conspicuously missing things in our society. This book can help alleviate that malady. The subtitle of this book is, "Communication of useful knowledge in religion, in the sciences, and in common life." This is a lithograph of an 1833 edition printed in London which also contains "A Discourse on the Education of Children and Youth."


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This is the sequel to Logic. A disciplined mind is one of the most conspicuously missing things in our society. This book can help alleviate that malady. The subtitle of this book is, "Communication of useful knowledge in religion, in the sciences, and in common life." This is a lithograph of an 1833 edition printed in London which also contains "A Discourse on the Educati This is the sequel to Logic. A disciplined mind is one of the most conspicuously missing things in our society. This book can help alleviate that malady. The subtitle of this book is, "Communication of useful knowledge in religion, in the sciences, and in common life." This is a lithograph of an 1833 edition printed in London which also contains "A Discourse on the Education of Children and Youth."

30 review for The Improvement of the Mind: A Supplement to Logic: With a Discourse on the Education of Children and Youth

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    The "original" how to read a book. This book teaches read, write, discuss also known as learn, act, share. Covers mentoring, effective conversations, memorizing, learning a language, recognizing a weak argument or book, and lots more. It's a free ebook on line. You should read it Stephanie, Heather, Celeste, Rachel, Karen. . . Just saying. The "original" how to read a book. This book teaches read, write, discuss also known as learn, act, share. Covers mentoring, effective conversations, memorizing, learning a language, recognizing a weak argument or book, and lots more. It's a free ebook on line. You should read it Stephanie, Heather, Celeste, Rachel, Karen. . . Just saying.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Becky Hintz

    A treasure trove of helpful, penetrating, and instructive gems buried in a mountain of words. If you want to find them, you'll need lots of patience and some skill in mining a text. In other words, this book is begging to be rewritten for today's typical reader. A treasure trove of helpful, penetrating, and instructive gems buried in a mountain of words. If you want to find them, you'll need lots of patience and some skill in mining a text. In other words, this book is begging to be rewritten for today's typical reader.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    OK. Dated but interesting and good in places. I never finished it as it was a bit long-winded.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Watts is probably best known for his hymn writing, but this is a helpful book on a wide range of topics. Many of his points are worth repeating and I think chapter 1 is well worth a read. From chapter 1 he says, “Presume not too much upon a bright genius, a ready wit, and good parts; for this without labor and study will never make a man of knowledge.” He goes on to say that a large quantity of reading and strong memory do not make one wise. He counsels students to not lean on their own wisdom, b Watts is probably best known for his hymn writing, but this is a helpful book on a wide range of topics. Many of his points are worth repeating and I think chapter 1 is well worth a read. From chapter 1 he says, “Presume not too much upon a bright genius, a ready wit, and good parts; for this without labor and study will never make a man of knowledge.” He goes on to say that a large quantity of reading and strong memory do not make one wise. He counsels students to not lean on their own wisdom, but to trust in God and ask him for guidance in all things (Prov. 3:5, 7). It is his providence that can direct a thought or conversation to be more useful than a month’s solitary study. Therefore, a man ought to “let industry and devotion join together.” In chapter 4, he says, “a man may be eating all day, and for want of digestion is never nourished, so these endless readers may cram themselves in vain with intellectual food, and without real improvement of their minds, for want of digesting it by proper reflections.” After Watts lists out some general rules in chapter 1, he plunges into the real matter of his writing. He talks on the methods of improving the mind (observation, reading, lectures, conversation and study), then moves on to topics like reading and judging books, improvement by conversation, debating, meditation, fixing the attention, improving the memory, determining whether a topic is worth pursuing, benefits of poetry and the natural sciences. Part 2 dives into how to best instruct others in the truth. It is a unique work and I’ve never read anything quite like it. Sometimes, it can feel a bit tedious due to the older style language, but I found it both enjoyable and profitable overall. It also happens to be available for free on the world wide web!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joshua George

    Word This book is made for studying. Reading it slow will reap the benefit of the instructions. Enough knowledge in there for the voracious reader to apply to every aspect of their daily life.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mfon Akpan

    Excellent. Timeless.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    A church I was visiting had this on their book table and it caught my attention for two reasons: it was by the great hymn writer Issac Watts and as I teach at a classical school the logic part intrigued me. Watts has much to say to parents and teachers about education. I found his insights very helpful.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kade

    Really good book Good to read the truth from different minds. This book proves Isaac Watts someone gifted with truth from God (although our definitions on that subject might differ.)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Francisco Son

    w0w i love it...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andre

  11. 5 out of 5

    Newelle

  12. 5 out of 5

    Wendi Wanders

  13. 5 out of 5

    Seth

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris Dunn

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cris

  16. 5 out of 5

    William

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paramjeet Singh

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Bartlett

  19. 4 out of 5

    herbiose

  20. 5 out of 5

    Buddy Williams

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark Jacobson

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nile Steinlurch

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stoute Mack

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eric Cahill

  27. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gift

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rebekyah

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

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